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How to choose the perfect TV make & model
SelectSmart.comBig screen? Flat screen? HD? HDTV? Ultra HD? On average, American adults watch five hours of television per day. Given that investment in our time, it makes sense to find the right TV for the money. The good news is that a new big screen TV costs less today in unadjusted dollars than a 20" color TV did in 1967!
This selector provides recommendations from over 130 of the best televisions available. Answer the questions below for a list of recommendations and information about the TV that best match your preferences. For greater accuracy, place "high priority" on a few considerations that matter most to you.

The first selector question is below.


1. How much would you like to spend on your television?
The prices below are based on manufacturers' suggested list prices. Each of your recommendations will link to product descriptions on Amazon.com, which are often sold below list price.
Under $500 (11 models in this price range; largest screen size is 55 inches)
Under $900 (46 models in this price range; two models are 60 inches and larger)
Under $1500 (74 models in this price range; many 60 inches and larger)
Under $1900 (94 models in this price range; many 60 inches and larger)
Under $2800 (114 models in this price range; many 60 inches and larger)
Under $4800 (130 models in this price range; many 60 inches and larger)
Under $8000 (137 models in this price range; many 60 inches and larger)
Money is no object
Prioritize your choice above:
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2. Check any and all screen sizes that are acceptable to you.
Screen sizes are measured diagonally. Models listed are those that will appear your results.
60 to 75 inches (58 models of this size range)
55 inches (42 models of this size range)
49 to 50 inches (20 models of this size range)
40 to 43 inches (nine models of this size range)
32 inches (six models of this size)
24 inches (two models of this size)
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3. How fine a detail do you want your TV to provide?
The more pixels the monitor displays, the better it captures fine detail. These numbers are known as the native resolution.
3840x2160 pixels, the most finely detailed image.
1920x1080 pixels, a more finely detailed image.
1366x768 pixels, a finely detailed image.
No preference
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4. Which display technology do you prefer?
LED LCD displays use a backlight to illuminate their pixels, while OLED's pixels actually produce their own light.
OLED benefits include blacker blacks and excellent viewing angles.
LED LCD These electroluminescent materials last longer without fading. LED LCD are generally less expensive than OLED TVs.
No preference
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5. Which frame rate do you prefer?
To a point reducing the time between frames minimizes motion blur. Our brains can only perceive so much motion. For perspective, modern Hollywood movies are projected in theaters at a rate of 24 frames per second. Some films, The Hobbit for example, was shown at 48 frames per second.
1400hz The image on your screen refreshes 1400 times per second.
960hz The image on your screen refreshes 960 times per second.
240hz and better is recommended for viewing fast-moving sports.
120hz The image on your screen refreshes 120 times per second.
60hz The image on your screen refreshes sixty times per second.
No preference
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6. Which streaming services do want to access?
Once upon a time televised entertainment was delivered over the air, through cable or beamed from a satellite. Now services deliver an array of entertainment including on-demand movie and TV shows, with exclusive and original content. Services can cost from $8 to $35 per month.
Amazon
Amazon Cloud Player
Amazon Prime Video
Google Play Movies & TV
HBO Go
HBO Now
Hulu
Hulu Plus
Milk Music
Netflix
Pandora
PlayStation Video
TuneIn
Vudu
YouTube
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7. Bang for your buck.
This is a quick way to determine your best buy regardless of whether you want the biggest screen or smallest screen. We calculated how much you would spend on per square inch of screen.
The most bang for your buck: Less than 50 cents per square inch of screen.
More bang for your buck: Less than $1.00 per square inch of screen.
Some bang for your buck: Less than $1.50 per square inch of screen.
Less bang for your buck: Less than $2.00 per square inch of screen.
Even less bang for your buck: Less than $3.00 per square inch of screen.
The least bang for your buck: Less than $4.70 per square inch of screen.
No preference
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8. Do you want a TV with that is Internet enabled?
Internet enabled TVs connect to the Internet through a WiFi or wired Ethernet connection.
Yes, that should be a standard feature.
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9. How deep from front to back can your TV be?
A consideration if you plan to place your TV in location of limited depth. Dimensions include the base and detachable speakers.
About an eighth of inch. Can be hung on a wall.
5.5 to 8 inches
8.1 to 10 inches
10 to 12 inches
12 to 14 inches
14.4 to 16.4 inches
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10. How many HDMI input connections do you want?
HDMI (High-Definition Multimedia Interface) is a digital audio/video connection. HDMI is the preferred cable to use when connecting a Blu-ray disc player, gaming system and/or cable/satellite set-top box.
At least one HDMI input connections.
At least two HDMI input connections.
At least three HDMI input connections. (Recommended)
At least four HDMI input connections.
At least five HDMI input connections.
No preference.
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11. Would you like a TV that is more energy efficient than average?
An energy efficient TV will cost, on average about $4 to $20 per year. The less energy efficient sets will cost $21 to $40.
Yes, energy efficient preferred. (You may have to sacrifice screen size while saving the planet.)
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12. What is your definition of high definition television?
HD HD is the original version of high definition television. The least expensive televisions are HD.
HDTV HDTV is an newer and improved version of high definition television. Less expensive than Ultra HD television sets.
Ultra HD Ultra HD provides superior picture quality, but you may need to be within a couple feet of the screen to appreciate it. 90% of sets analyzed by this selector are Ultra HD.
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Now that you have answered all the questions, continue to the Show Me My Results button below.

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