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 Lorie's article, "Indigo, the color of money"
Author: Albert Marsh (---.proxy.aol.com)
Date:   07-06-04 01:40

Reading the article was a very unpleasant experience. Lorie is determined to discredit James Twyman and the whole subject of Indigo children. She projects a thick fog of judgementalness and disaster. She sees the indigo phenomenon as a dangerous and phony thing and warns against the danger of considering any child as special or gifted with paranormal powers. The truth is that every child is born perfect and complete with all the paranormal gifts, but it's being raised by parents who dread their children being "abnormal" that squelches these innate abilities. Some children who are so powerfully psychic that the are able to withstand this desensitization are able to keep their psychic abilities. Many of us who are sincerely trying to live lives truly devoted to Jesus' precepts of oneness, brotherhood, non-judgementalness, and openess and surrender to the love within us and to the love in others who have also surrendered, find that our senses gradually become heightened as we release the negative emotions and blocks and we begin to have truely amazing epiphanies and paranormal experiences. These may include altered, cosmic consciousness, deeply loving and moving encounters with strangers, intuitive understandings of our true oneness with each other and nature, and joyous loving relationships with our spouses and children and relatives, as well as in our workplaces. We understand that our purpose in being here is to aid others in reaching this blissful state, or in dedicating our lives to healing the prevailing disharmony.
These gifted children will find their own way to using their gifts in healing the madness in the world. They can't be stopped, either by their parents or societiy's misguided attempts to normalize them. It will simply be a matter of a few years, some say ten, for their true natures to begin to bring about a new era of peace and love, in spite of people like Lorie's misguided attempts to protect them from the
world's resistance to change.

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 Re: Lorie's article, "Indigo, the color of money"
Author: Lorie Anderson (---.pc.ashlandfiber.net)
Date:   07-06-04 13:52

You wrote: "Some children who are so powerfully psychic that the are able to withstand this desensitization are able to keep their psychic abilities."

So, contact the James Randi Educational Foundation: http://www.randi.org/research/index.html and demonstrate this assertion. I will gladly eat humble pie and you will win a million dollars to keep or donate to the organization of your choice, if you can demonstrate even one child's psychic abilities in a carefully arranged objective study -- all excuses aside. If you don't like Randi's organization, there are similar ones offering big awards for proof of paranormal claims.

Lorie



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 Re: Lorie's article, "Indigo, the color of money"
Author: Albert Marsh (---.proxy.aol.com)
Date:   07-29-04 10:51

Lori, you must be from Missouri, no offense intended. Belief in the existence of the great mystery comes when something from that mystery is able to break through one's powerful, protective barriers. An epiphany! Everyone has had them, even skeptics. But when they happen to skeptics, their world view is so threatened and they feel such fear that they must deny and reject it with every fiber of their being and immediately erase it from memory. In other words, they are self-perpetuating non-believers. So they never let those pulse pounding sunrises an sunsets be anything more than just nice, or let those moments of beautiful loving intimacy with their partner ever go beyond just pleasant into the dangerous uncontrollable relm of breathless ecstasy.

I know this sounds like judgementalness to you, and I admit that it is. But please, just look at your hand and really see it as if it's something you've never seen before. Every whorl on your fingertips, every fingernail, everj joint, your opposing thumb, every baby's precious little hand, every new leaf in spring, is telling you that behind this omnipresent perfection is an invisable Creator with a benevolent intelligence Who made us and every other miraculous creation on earth, and put us here on earth for some unknown reason. Our actions and lives can be in alignmnent with that reason and support that benevolence and creativity, or you can just dismiss it and say "Hey, there is no god, there is no mystery, I'll give you a million dollars if you can prove it. Life sucks and then you die." A little ungrateful, don't you think?

Albert Marsh
SlvrbearLA@aol.

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 Re: Lorie's article, "Indigo, the color of money"
Author: Albert Marsh (---.proxy.aol.com)
Date:   07-29-04 11:23

Lori, I am responding to your challenge about proving psychic abilities in general, and about the need to stamp out any nascent psychic abilities in chidren demonstrating such abilities. Children are usually able to survive their parent's attemps to eliminate them, although they pay a great emotional price as a result. A friend of mine here in La La land is making a documentary on psychics, interviewing them and asking about how this gift has affected their lives. It's pretty much true that they have been damaged in some way, but the gift usually can't be supressed. Of course, you deny its very existance. God help your children if they should be born with this ability. All I'm asking for is that you be a little less judgemantal about things you don't understand.

So actually it doesn't matter to you what any psychic may say or how accurate their gifts may be, it's all smoke and mirrors to you. Well, least I responded. I'll keep you posted about the film.

Albert Marsh



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 Re: Lorie's article, "Indigo, the color of money"
Author: Lorie Anderson (---.pc.ashlandfiber.net)
Date:   07-29-04 11:51

Your post is so replete with presumptions and assumptions about me and what I think and feel and believe that I shouldn't bother to honor your post with much of a reply, but here goes.

I suspect that you didn't really read my article, or you missed the point. There is nothing critical of anyone's religious beliefs in my articles nor did I even broach the subject of the meaning and mysteries of life. In fact, I have never seen anyone more full of awe for the mysteries of life and the universe than Carl Sagan, skeptic and scientist.

I wrote against tricking children (or pressuring them to trick themselves or to pretend to others) to think they are reading through blindfolds and the like and I wrote against making big bucks selling one's purported telepathic communication with children, etc.

Yes, the notion of superior paranormal children is ridiculous and potentially harmful. To me, it shows how little some people really know about how marvelous all children are, naturally and normally, each bringing their own unique gifts to this world. And how selfish, for adults to burden children with the responsibility for somehow paranormally bringing about world peace in the future. That's our responsibility!! We have to do it for them, not them for us. Good grief!! We cannot just sit back and wait for a purported new breed of children to save the world. Like I said in my article, put your mouth where the money is. If your paranormal children claims are for real, then stop making up things about what I believe or don't believe and take it to the test; take it to James Randi, and win yourself a million dollars -- use it to save the beautiful and miraculous indigo, black, brown, tan, yellow, red, and beige children dying of starvation around the world right now as we speak.
Lorie



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 Re: Lorie's article, "Indigo, the color of money"
Author: Albert Marsh (---.proxy.aol.com)
Date:   07-30-04 10:51

Lori, I'm ready for round three. But first let me say this to clear the air somewhat. I applaud what you're doing and intend no discouragement of it. Your willingness to take up the cudgel and work to redress the wrongs that you see in the world is something that very few people are willing to do. And you don't let criticism discourage you. As you well know, there will always be criticism from people who don't agree with yoy. There should be someone willing to be a whistle blower for people who exploit the gifts of spirit. If these people are corrupt, and there's a long history of fake psychics and mediums, they must be exposed. Ironically, when those who are truly gifted by spirit try to use their gifts for exploitation or profit, the gifts are taken away, and they are forced to resort to fraud to keep the scam going.

You make me think and clarify my responses. I intend no harm to anyone, and perhaps my feeling the need to try to get you to be less judgemental about psychic phrnomenon and true, deep and transforming mystical experiences is in itself to be criticized. I always say that I accept the world and everything as perfect just the way it is, but that doesn't mean that there's no work to be done. I think we are both working toward a better world, a world where absolute truth and compassion is the standard to which all actions are held.

Whether there are Indigo children or not is of no consequence. These children as they are described are totally self sufficient and fearless and are so bright and resourceful that they know how to take care of themselves, no matter what opposition they may encounter from the world. My bottom line is that I am now looking at every wonderful child I encounter as if it had these capabilities. Perhaps if this attitude were more prevelant and all children were treated this way, by the time they are adults they would indeed begin to transform the world.

The experiences of the parents of immensly gifted children, way beyond the norm, indigo or not, are beginning to appear in books and on websites. For myself, I support and encourage and am encouraged by this phenomena. Maybe this whole thing is just a movement to raise our children in a new way, respecting and nurturing their innate wisdom. And don't think that the people who are aware of this are just sitting back and waiting for the kids to save the world, we are all doing everything in our power to redress the ills we see, just like you.

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 Re: Lorie's article, "Indigo, the color of money"
Author: Lorie Anderson (---.pc.ashlandfiber.net)
Date:   07-30-04 11:44

Great reply. Now, I think your reply is exemplary of the concept of "reconciliation" in the face of differing perspectives/opinions. I will leave it at this.
Thanks,
Lorie



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 Re: Lorie's article, "Indigo, the color of money"
Author: Taryn (---.224.66.147.Dial1.Cincinnati1.Level3.net)
Date:   08-03-04 16:24

Alberts reply was indeed great...to condense his message to that of being reconcilitory appears you missed the meaning. "Great Reply, Thank you" would have meant more.

I am finished here. Thank you all

Taryn

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 Re: Lorie's article, "Indigo, the color of money"
Author: Lorie (---.pc.ashlandfiber.net)
Date:   08-03-04 21:44

I wasn't condensing anything; I was extending a compliment to the man.

Lorie

Defintion of reconcile:
verb

1 to find a way in which two situations or beliefs that are opposed to each other can agree and exist together.

2 be reconciled When two people are reconciled they become friendly again after they have argued.

Definition of reconciliation

noun

1 when two people or groups of people become friendly again after they have argued.

2 the process of making two opposite beliefs, ideas or situations agree.



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 Re: Lorie's article, "Indigo, the color of money"
Author: Marie (---.236.201.103.Dial1.NewYork1.Level3.net)
Date:   01-04-05 06:30

Lorie,

You are obviously wasting your time arguing here. Logic arguments are useless in front of wishful thinking.

For some, believing in, inter alia, "indigo children" is a necessity. Far easy than confronting the facts of life witouth fantasies and/or excuses.

Best regards,

Marie

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 Re: Lorie's article, "Indigo, the color of money"
Author: vicki (61.68.38.---)
Date:   01-28-05 03:54

What i can say for myself is that to me my child has a higher understanding of life than i did as a child myself and also that of my mother. To me you have to recognise the fact that being born into this world as it is know these children have come with an insight way above the things that we had to be aware of. I feel so blessed that i can relate to my child better with the foresight of reading 'The Indido Child' (authors Lee Carroll and Jan Tober)

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 Re: Lorie's article, "Indigo, the color of money"
Author: Cesidio Tallini (---.ny5030.east.verizon.net)
Date:   02-06-05 09:23

Friends,

All I wish to add to this discussion is this: when it is raining, and someone is outside and getting the rain in his face, you don't ask that person whether he "believes" it is raining. You KNOW that, just as much as the person that is out there getting wet. You know that, not because your hair is wet, but based on something called human experience, something only the insane would deny.

Well, I am an Indigo, a 42-year-old Indigo. I was an Indigo long before Lee Carroll and Jan Tober's book, "The Indigo Children." I don't "believe" I'm an Indigo: my hair is all wet with it! Actually, if I denied it, I would be deceiving you.

So the situation is like this: 1) Some people's hair is getting wet, and they are mentioning it, and they may be few, just as other gifted human beings are few; 2) Some people don't know what having wet hair is like, and since they generally distrust human beings, they assume that they are lieing; 3) Some people choose to believe that the people who mentioning the wet hair must be experiencing something, either because they trust human beings more, or because similar situations have occurred to them (some of us did feel sad when some person passed away, while others that even knew that person couldn't have cared any less, so there are some things you feel or perceive more than other people); 4) Some people choose to believe, and since they see that many others also believe, they try to make money off of it; 5) Finally, some people choose not to believe, and since they noticed that there are plenty of people like them as well, they attempt to make money off of them too.

You cannot "prove" that JFK's death was sad; if you were alive at that time, and remember the moment, you either felt that way, or you didn't. One needs to add that even those of us most sensitive don't always feel sad when somebody passes away, so we cannot generalise either.

This is basically what Lorie is asking people to do here when she says that the James Randi Educational Foundation, and similar ones, have millions of dollars if you can prove you get sad when people die. Well, I do Lorie, believe it or not!, but I can't say I felt sad when Arafat died, so what exactly are you trying to measure here? Are you trying to measure highly predictable physical phenomena, like the speed and path of a projectile, or less easy and straightforward things, such as human perception? Also, are you really trying to study this, and you have an open mind to begin with, or are you just trying to deny the existence of a whole range of human phenomena, only trying to re-affirm your world view? This is hardly a scientific way of handling things. It is a BIASED way of handling things.

Lorie does not understand that since we are measuring human beings, bias, as in all psychological experiments, is inevitable, and the most productive attitude is "You are innocent until proven guilty," rather than "You are guilty, until proven innocent." I am innocent Lorie, and guileless, yet you are only just trying to prove the opposite! How can you say that you are really trying to study these things, when you are not? Since I last spoke to Lorie about these things, in fact, I have decided to join the American Society for Psychical Research (http://www.aspr.com). This organisation will definitely study this Indigo phenomena if given half a chance, but I have severe doubts that the James Randi Educational Foundation ever will.

Anyway, "Indigo" was a really beautiful movie, and I say this also from experience, and I recommend you pre-order the DVD from Amazon.com if you can. The same thing that happened to that girl in the movie, happened to me in the Fall of 1984, on a day I'll never forget.

Is it more dangerous to tell your child that they can develop these abilities, or what Steven Spielberg is doing: telling children all over the world that if their name ends with a vowel, they will never be anything but a mafioso? While the former approach can place a heavy burden on children, I think the latter approach is far more dangerous. It is more dangerous to tell children what they can't do, rather than telling them what they can; the former is about limits imposed by others, while the latter is about limits imposed only by yourself and your own abilities.

Cesidio Tallini

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 Re: Lorie's article, "Indigo, the color of money"
Author: Don Anderson (---.server.ntli.net)
Date:   02-10-05 14:17

May I ask the believers in psychic phenomena, what they see wrong with proving the ability?

What can possibly be wrong with proving to non-believers that what you believe is real can be measured?

If something is elusive to measurement or proof, is that perhaps indicative of something? Like perhaps how tangible or real it is?

I must confess that I found the notion of 'Indigo' people attractive, I wanted to think that I was one. After rejecting the religion that I was taught as a child, I found myself searching for something else that would make me feel secure, that would answer unanswerable questions that plagued me about the injustices of the world.
The depressing truth (with a small t) is that the world is inherently unjust, we are inherently insecure, and life is not easy.
This is not easy to come to terms with, and avoiding this truth is the reason why most religious beliefs exist, in my opinion.

Anything that someone can state as fact, should stand up to criticism without the need for blind faith, faith without evidence or proof, else it remains a religious belief, as useful as a belief in invisible leprechauns that hide your glasses or keys in the morning.

The above is a little harsh, I suppose, and I do not wish to upset people by what I say, but I can no longer stand by and watch as people continue to ask people to believe in things that avoid proof. I've heard that the Devil hides himself well, that God works in mysterious ways, and so many other similar trite sayings that prove or explain nothing other than the fact that people tend to believe what they want to believe in the interests of an easier life.

I hope no-one comes to any harm as a result of the 'Indigo' phenomenon.

All the best all.

Don

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 Re: Lorie's article, "Indigo, the color of money"
Author: Chris (---.peak.org)
Date:   03-03-05 11:26

This is an interesting 'debate'. I'm responding to Cesidio Tallini's post specifically.

Cesidio, you worded your thoughts very succinctly and I applaud your efforts to explain what you experience, no doubt here, on a daily basis.

It's interesting to me that humans continually seek to prove the existence of spiritual phenomena. Perhaps the spirit escapes scientific attempts to prove anything about it. Perhaps the nature of the spirit (God) cannot be defined or tricked or patronized by humans.

To me it boils down to flesh/material/science/creation/religion/politics vs. spirit/God/infinite-wisdom/freedom/revelation. Perhaps reconciliation is all we can achieve. But an even more powerful archetype is cooperation.

Regardless of your religious or scientific beliefs, one thing we can all hopefully agree on is the gift of choice. We all have it and it is perhaps the most important gift.

~C



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 Re: Lorie's article,
Author: Lorie Anderson 
Date:   03-05-05 10:08

Interesting that my commentary on someone who makes paranormal claims became a discussion on spirituality. I'm sure there is a link between the two, no doubt, but that isn't the point or focus of my article. You can certainly be soaking wet with your own perceptions, but to then claim that your own perceptions are an actual reality, you enter the realm of scientific discovery. Paranormal claims can be tested, and are not just a matter of perception and experience and opinion. That's what James Randi does, he tests these claims, and he does it well because he knows how to eliminate trickery and bias and other intervening variables. Trickery is very common when it comes to people trying to make money or gain power among those soaking wet with seemingly real paranormal experiences. Please read some of my new links on my Indigo page, especially about those who wrote about their journey from paranormal believer to skepticism.

Thanks for posting, all.
Lorie



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 Re: Lorie's article, "Indigo, the color of money"
Author: Cesidio Tallini (---.ny5030.east.verizon.net)
Date:   03-15-05 16:33

To the Andersons:

The problem with the scientific study of paranormal phenomena, and why you must be very careful when you do it, is that it is similar to emotions: you either perceive certain feelings, or you don't. The same applies with paranormal phenomena.

Randi is not interested in measuring paranormal phenomena through his foundation, but debuking it. That is not the same thing. Scientific research is about the establishment of facts, not the denial of them because of lack of evidence. That is not science, but pseudoscience.

Randi is not interested in discovering whether psychic phenomena happens 80% of the time in certain individuals, or whether it happens 20% of the time. Even if it happens only 20% of the time in gifted individuals that can still be significant, especially when you can show that the 20% is not particularly due to chance. Randi is only interested in taking the 20% or 80% of the time it doesn't happen, and then claiming that this "proves" that ESP and that other Psy stuff is hogwash. Isn't this what you guys are saying here?

So Randi is basically attempting to show that since something doesn't happen, it does not exist. That, I'll have you note, proves nothing, and is actually a logical fallacy:

Appeal to Ignorance Fallacy
http://www.fallacyfiles.org/ignorant.html

Also, you cannot "prove" Psy phenomena anymore you can "prove" regular psychological behavior. Therefore, even the methodology starts from the premises of a logical fallacy:

False Analogy
http://www.fallacyfiles.org/wanalogy.html

Cesidio Tallini



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 Re: Lorie's article, "Indigo, the color of money"
Author: Lorie Anderson 
Date:   03-15-05 19:43

Thanks for writing; I'll read this last message again more carefully soon, but just wanted to mention that poster Don Anderson and I are not related, we just happen to have the same last name.

Lorie



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 Re: Lorie's article,
Author: Lorie Anderson 
Date:   03-20-05 17:23

Anyone who has seen a good magician at work knows that illusions can appear incredibly believable. I had the pleasure of seeing magician Harry Anderson (also not related to me) in action years ago. He was so good at the art of illusion that I even asked him afterward if he has any psychic or telepathic powers. He said no, not even a little bit. Later, he taught my husband a few tricks, like how to turn the pulse in his wrist off and on. He taught my husband how to appear to push a long, fat needle painfully through the skin on his arm, making it appear to bleed. It looked and felt very, very real to me to watch him, but it was all about illusion and how easily we can jump to paranormal conclusions.

Technically, science doesnt attempt to prove or disprove anything but attempts to measure and weigh evidence for and against certain hypotheses. We use words in the vernacular, like debunked or disproved, when the overwhelming preponderance of solid evidence shows the claims to be unfeasible and untenable.

Some paranormal claims, like spoon bending, for example, would be easy to test, as long as the test is set up carefully and the testers know the tricks involved (enter people like James Randi). But, I can also see how some claims would be impossible or hard to test, like claims of sporadic paranormal powers, or of paranormal events that dont appear under the pressure of testing, for some reason, or something intrinsic to an individual, like hearing voices purportedly from another planet. But, certainly we can look at the plausibility of these explanations in light of what we already know (a preponderance of the evidence) about how things work, the laws of nature, and whether there is credible evidence for related paranormal claims that have been tested. We can look at likely explanations (e.g. misinterpretation or selective thinking, etc.), or we can admit that we don't know why some things occur, which does not mean the true explanation must therefore be supernatural or paranormal.

Randi is not what I would call a paranormal investigator; hes an investigator of paranormal claims. Hes in the business of calling on people to show evidence for their claims, believing as many scientists do, that the burden of proof (evidence that holds up under close scrutiny) for extraordinary claims rests with the claimant. Randi is in the business of serving the public interest against deception and deceivers, and promoting critical thinking skills.

I feel sure that if paranormal phenomena became evident to Randi, even to a miniscule degree, hed be shouting this discovery from the rooftops. He'd become rich and famous to discover paranormal events that could be demonstrated under the kind of controlled conditions that he insists upon.

Not only has Randi not seen evidence for paranormal claims, but he has seen evidence of the opposite: deception, tricksters, self-deception, people rendered powerless when scientific controls against cheating were enforced -- time and time again. Randi himself would tell us that his experiments dont prove that people dont experience paranormal events. But, the lack of evidence for paranormal events, and the preponderance of evidence pointing instead to deception or misinterpretation, weighs heavily against building our understanding of the world upon paranormal explanations.

Cesidio, Im not an expert on the subject, but I do believe the "argument to ignorance" fallacy supports my point of view. It says that just because scientists cant prove people dont have paranormal experiences, or cant disprove that they do, this alone does not strengthen the argument that paranormal phenomena exist.

Heres are some excerpts from the logical fallacy site that you mentioned here:
There are a few types of reasoning which resemble the fallacy of Appeal to Ignorance, and need to be distinguished from it:
the burden of proof is usually on a person making a new or improbable claim, and the presumption may be that such a claim is false. For instance, suppose that I claim that I was taken by flying saucer to another planet, but when challenged I can supply no evidence of this unusual trip. It would not be an Appeal to Ignorance for you to reason that, since there is no evidence that I visited another planet, therefore I probably didn't do so.

Sorry, but on your false analogy link, I dont easily see how it applies to this argument.

Thanks for engaging in this discussion.

Lorie



Post Edited (12-09-05 19:13)

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 Re: Lorie's article, "Indigo, the color of money"
Author: Clair (---.hsd1.wa.comcast.net)
Date:   06-28-05 12:20

Lorie,

"Twyman and Lee have reported that the University of California at Irvine, specifically the Center for Aging and Dementia, has researched and "confirmed" the effects of BR. However, this department at UCI tells me they have not conducted any studies on Lee's BR program, per se -- let alone confirmed its paranormal claims."

I would like to see scientific evidence and proof that an authority there really showed this to you. Please supply.

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 Re: Lorie's article, "Indigo, the color of money"
Author: Brenda (---.hsd1.wa.comcast.net)
Date:   06-28-05 12:44

And, Don,

Could you please give scientific evidence prooving your theory that there are no auras around humans the color of indigo that can't be seen by the naked human eye?

Thank goodness you people weren't around to influence those who thought the world was flat, until the high power telescope was invented and proved it scientifically.

If you'd like to fund the creation of the invention that allows everyone to see auras, I'm sure there are inventors waiting for you.

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 Re: Lorie's article, "Indigo, the color of money"
Author: Lorie Anderson 
Date:   06-28-05 16:45

Glad to see you're doing some research yourself.

To answer: I received an email reply to this effect from that UCI department. Later, this department at UCI reported the same thing to a reporter for an article about Lee. I don't think you'd take my word for it anyway, so why don't you ask them yourself.

I suspect that Twyman made the claim as a repeat of Lee's claim.

Lorie

Clair wrote:
> Lorie,
>
> "Twyman and Lee have reported that the University of
> California at Irvine, specifically the Center for Aging and
> Dementia, has researched and "confirmed" the effects of BR.
> However, this department at UCI tells me they have not
> conducted any studies on Lee's BR program, per se -- let alone
> confirmed its paranormal claims."
>
> I would like to see scientific evidence and proof that an
> authority there really showed this to you. Please supply.

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 Re: Lorie's article, "Indigo, the color of money"
Author: Lorie Anderson 
Date:   06-30-05 14:25

Brenda, on the question of auras, let me refer you to my Indigo web page links on "synaesthesia:"

http://abc.net.au/science/news/stories/s1224535.htm"My favourite
aunt is purple -- Why some people see 'auras' around their loved ones.

http://www.news-medical.net/?id=5619"Psychic powers that enable people to see
auras around others may simply be a quirk of the
brain."

http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?colID=1&articleID=0003014B-9D06-1E8F-8EA5809EC5880000"Hearing Colors,
Tasting Shapes."

http://msnbc.msn.com/id/3540645/"Real Rhapsody in Blue."

To quote one article: "These colours do not reflect hidden energies being given off by other people, rather they are created entirely in the brain of the beholder."

I think it's a fascinating subject.

Lorie

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 Re: Lorie's article, "Indigo, the color of money"
Author: Sara Patterson (---.proxy.aol.com)
Date:   01-07-06 19:42

I have eight children, four of them with ADHD. They share many of the characteristics of those called Indigo children.

Two of them, especially, are incredibly insightful into people and the spiritual realm. I believe they are often distracted because they pick up on other people's emotions and feelings. They are very sensitive, kind-hearted kids.

Of course there is a spiritual realm. Of course there are kids who are really in tune with their intuition and can "feel" or "sense" things that others can't.

I teach my kids to cultivate their unique gifts, and use them to help others. But it is quite ludicrous to jump to the conclusion that these kids are some sort of alternate human race or breed of people.

Go back in history. Study other trailblazing revolutionaries who challenged authority, saw the world in different ways and were very intuitive. Michaelangelo, Monet, Edison, Einstein, Galileo, Isaac Newton...the list goes on and on.

What IS new is that parents and society are more open to cultivating their child's gifts and passions. When we grew up, our parents didn't talk about and know about different learning styles, they weren't i tune with our every strength and weakness.

So now, more involved parents recognize these really amazing qualities inside these special kids...and as usual, some people just go too far with it.

My other four children are equally amazing in different ways. But I never make the conclusion that they are part of some new breed of people.

Give Lori a break--if you are going to make claims such as you are, then be prepared to back it up. She's not being outrageous.

Bottom line. Celebrate your kids, cultivate their gifts and talents, encourage them to use their gifts to benefit others.

Sara Patterson
www.best-summer-camps.com

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 Re: Lorie's article, "Indigo, the color of money"
Author: Don Anderson (---.server.ntli.net)
Date:   01-31-06 14:16

For Brenda: A friend of mine always claimed to see auras. He had also taken note of the ways in which the senses can be deceived by defects in parts of the brain or neural pathways.
Under the influence of Lysergic Acid, LSD, the part of the brain right at the center that is responsible for processing sensory information, essentially sending it on to the correct parts of the brain for interpreting gets badly mixed up, meaning that people suffer hallucinations, and can sometimes experience 'seeing sounds' or 'smelling colours'.

The friend in question later discovered that he had epilepsy, in fact a physical seizure whilst driving nearly caused his death. He also described the sypmtoms of Temporal Lobe Epilepsy, and had at some point had a tumour in his brain.

Seeing 'Auras' may be very attractive to some people, but it doesn't really have to mean anything of any significance, in my opinion. Other than perhaps indicating that there might be something unusual going on in the brain, in my friends case it may have been an indicator of what was to come.

Thank you for the links Lorie, as always you have been very helpful.

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