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A short game sheds light on government policy, corporate America and why no one likes to be wrong.

Posted by Dick 
Re: A short game sheds light on government policy, corporate America and why no one likes to be wrong.
July 10, 2015 05:13PM
Indy, why do you believe that the sequence "2, 4, 8" is more familiar than the sequence "2, 4, 6"? I don't get it. To me, each sequence clearly suggests a specific pattern.

Given the sequence "2, 4, 8" the most often guessed next sequence is probably something like, "16, 32, 64." IOW, the "guessed" sequence is an attempt to confirm the rule "double the previous number."

Given the sequence "2, 4, 6" the most often guessed next sequence is probably something like "8, 10, 12." IOW, the "guessed" sequence is an attempt to confirm the rule "add 2 to the previous number."

Both guesses, however, are attempts to confirm a particular rule, not to falsify it.
Right - each one suggests a specific pattern - so there is no need to change the numbers.

Seriously now, Dick - is this the kind of game you play when you're on vacation or just getting wild on the weekend or something? smiling smiley
Re: A short game sheds light on government policy, corporate America and why no one likes to be wrong.
July 10, 2015 11:03PM
LOL Only when I can't find an online chess partner!

No, but I will admit that I am fascinated by the evolution of the brain and of the thinking process, in general. There are reasons that people seek confirmation of their beliefs rather than falsification. In many cases, to think rationally is an unnatural act. That's why so few people do it well spontaneously.
Rationality is a natural process for the skeptical mind.
Re: A short game sheds light on government policy, corporate America and why no one likes to be wrong.
July 11, 2015 06:59PM
Not really. Rationality is hard if by rationality you mean to think critically. The linked Times article shows that as do a plethora of published studies. Critical thinking, for the most part, is a slow, cumbersome, artificial process. Those skills can definitely be learned but rarely, if ever, is anyone born with them.

The problem is that our brains have evolved to reach quick, short-cut answers, in many cases, NOT to the question "Is this reality?" but instead to the question "Is this my best chance to survive?"

The answers to those 2 questions are not always the same. Our brains will give us a false answer about reality if that false answer has proved to be useful to our ancestors' survival. To cite an often used example, it's much, much better "to see" a tiger that's not really there than it is to not see a tiger that is there. So our brains will and do sometimes complete pictures of reality for us with very, very little sensory data on which to draw. The trouble is, this "reality" often times doesn't jibe with actual reality even though we can't tell the difference.
The only problem there is your logical thinking has continually led you to conclusions on this board that are diametrically opposed to reality.
Re: A short game sheds light on government policy, corporate America and why no one likes to be wrong.
July 11, 2015 11:43PM
You are so out of your element on this board. You can't even use the word "logical" in an unequivocal way.
Well we are talking about your "logic", Dick.
Right away I saw 2 possible rules that fit.

First I entered 3 9 27

and got "Yes!"

Then I entered 3 6 12

and got "Yes".

There are probably other rules that work.
Numbers under 10, yada yada yada

It's a game only Dick would enjoy. But hey - that's why we love him... because he's an ultranerd.
Lol @ Indy not understanding the puzzle and then trying to give Dick a hard time. Classic. grinning smiley
Trying to think of a reason to love Navy...
Here's one:

Click the link in the OP again, scroll down, then click on "I don't want to play; just tell me the answer."

You're welcome.
Nope... that didn't work either.
Re: A short game sheds light on government policy, corporate America and why no one likes to be wrong.
July 23, 2015 05:12PM
Quote
Hornswoggle
Right away I saw 2 possible rules that fit.

First I entered 3 9 27

and got "Yes!"

Then I entered 3 6 12

and got "Yes".

There are probably other rules that work.

You misunderstand, Hornswoggle. You're supposed to try to guess what the rule is. not guess sequences of numbers that obey the rule.The sequence 3, 9, 27 DOES fit the rule, so what does that lead you to believe that the rule is? If you believe the rule is "Cube the previous number" then you would be mistaken.

You must not have read the instructions. (I think Indy probably read instructions but, unsurprisingly, didn't understand them.)
Numbers under 10. That "rule" applies.

All even numbers. That "rule" applies.

Numbers divisible by 2. That "rule" applies.

Numbers less than 9. That "rule" applies.

Numbers that divide evenly into 24. That "rule" applies.

They can list any freakin' rule they want and I'm sure you and the other nerds would think it proves something when you and everyone else gives the "wrong" answer (that just also happens to be a "rule" too... like "doubling numbers"winking smiley. Outside of a classroom experiment in geekdom there is nothing to be learned here.
Re: A short game sheds light on government policy, corporate America and why no one likes to be wrong.
July 24, 2015 01:42AM
Quote
Indy!
Numbers under 10. That "rule" applies.

All even numbers. That "rule" applies.

Numbers divisible by 2. That "rule" applies.

Numbers less than 9. That "rule" applies.

Numbers that divide evenly into 24. That "rule" applies.

They can list any freakin' rule they want and I'm sure you and the other nerds would think it proves something when you and everyone else gives the "wrong" answer (that just also happens to be a "rule" too... like "doubling numbers"winking smiley. Outside of a classroom experiment in geekdom there is nothing to be learned here.

Do I sense a bit of frustration? smiling smiley

Clearly the rule is not "Numbers under 10" because the sequence "3,6,18" obeys the rule and 18 is greater than 10.

Clearly the rule is not "All even numbers" because the sequence "3,6,18" obeys the rule and 3 is not an even number.

Etc.

It's stunning that you haven't guessed the rule yet. In the original study upon which this little game is based I think only 1 participant out of the 29 total participants in the study never guessed the rule.
If you believe the rule is "Cube the previous number" then you would be mistaken. - Dick

That's not the rule I applied in 3 9 27. 2 4 8 is an integer to the first power followed by the same integer to the second power followed by the same integer to the third power. 4 16 64 also works.

There's no way for anyone to guess the rule the writer had in mind, as many rules could apply.



Edited 8 time(s). Last edit at 07/24/2015 08:04AM by Hornswoggle.
There's no way for anyone to guess the rule the writer had in mind, as many rules could apply.

Thanks for the support Hornsy.



Edit: Now please explain to Dick why my "numbers under 10" rule would also work for the sequence 2, 4, 8. He's obviously having trouble here. eye rolling smiley



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 07/24/2015 03:55AM by Indy!.
To be honest, I kind of rushed through the test. Had other things going on here when I took it. I never got around to guessing the rule. So I kinda f'ucked it up.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 07/24/2015 08:07AM by Hornswoggle.
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