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A short game sheds light on government policy, corporate America and why no one likes to be wrong.

Posted by Dick 
That's why you don't let them take you to the hospital unless you're already dying. thumbs up
Re: A short game sheds light on government policy, corporate America and why no one likes to be wrong.
July 28, 2015 04:56AM
Quote
Dick
Part 1

OK, this is all a bit beyond Indy, who I seriously doubt entered any numbers at all into the game because he failed to understand what was being asked of him. But had he been able to grasp the concepts involved, the odds are good that he would have entered some sequence of numbers like "1,2,4" or perhaps "4,8,16" to test the hypothesis "The rule is to double the numeric value of each succeding number in the sequence.

As it happens, all such sequences obey the rule.

Part 2

Only trouble is the correct rule is NOT "Double the numeric value of each succeeding number in the sequence." This was a false belief that results from confirmation bias.
Right. The tip-off on that was when they said "The rule was simply: Each number must be larger than the one before it."

I'm still proud of you for figuring out the doubling thing though. thumbs up
Re: A short game sheds light on government policy, corporate America and why no one likes to be wrong.
July 28, 2015 05:44AM
Right. But when you entered "The rule is to double the numeric value of each succeeding number in the sequence" for the rule, you were mistaken because of confirmation bias.
Re: A short game sheds light on government policy, corporate America and why no one likes to be wrong.
July 28, 2015 11:18AM
You might consider testing your beliefs, the important ones anyway, by occasionally trying to disconfirm them rather than seeking only to confirm them. To do so improves your odds of believing things that are true.
Dick - you have no idea how I go about confirming or not confirming things and that test tells you nothing about me in that regard. What's happening is YOUR confirmation bias is leading YOU to believe something about me based on insufficient evidence.
Re: A short game sheds light on government policy, corporate America and why no one likes to be wrong.
July 28, 2015 05:47PM
You don't know what cofirmation bias is. And that's OK. You're not interested in this kind of thing. No problem.
Now you're catching on. smoking smiley
Re: A short game sheds light on government policy, corporate America and why no one likes to be wrong.
July 28, 2015 11:58PM
No, I'm not "catching on." I've known that about you since virtually the first day you were here. You're symptomatic of what's mostly wrong with the country.
Re: A short game sheds light on government policy, corporate America and why no one likes to be wrong.
July 29, 2015 06:25PM
What does your imaginary girlfriend think about your obsession with . . . well, you know?
Why don't you ask her... since you seem to be the only one imagining her?
Re: A short game sheds light on government policy, corporate America and why no one likes to be wrong.
July 29, 2015 07:44PM
Oh, that's right, you imagined that your imaginary girlfriend moved out some time ago in the past, didn't you? I'd forgotten about that.
Dick - don't tell me you're another terminal virgin like Navy. There's no way we can possibly have TWO of them on the board.
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