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A short game sheds light on government policy, corporate America and why no one likes to be wrong.

Posted by Dick 
Lol @ Indy not understanding the puzzle and then trying to give Dick a hard time. Classic. grinning smiley
Trying to think of a reason to love Navy...
Here's one:

Click the link in the OP again, scroll down, then click on "I don't want to play; just tell me the answer."

You're welcome.
Nope... that didn't work either.
Re: A short game sheds light on government policy, corporate America and why no one likes to be wrong.
July 23, 2015 05:12PM
Quote
Hornswoggle
Right away I saw 2 possible rules that fit.

First I entered 3 9 27

and got "Yes!"

Then I entered 3 6 12

and got "Yes".

There are probably other rules that work.

You misunderstand, Hornswoggle. You're supposed to try to guess what the rule is. not guess sequences of numbers that obey the rule.The sequence 3, 9, 27 DOES fit the rule, so what does that lead you to believe that the rule is? If you believe the rule is "Cube the previous number" then you would be mistaken.

You must not have read the instructions. (I think Indy probably read instructions but, unsurprisingly, didn't understand them.)
Numbers under 10. That "rule" applies.

All even numbers. That "rule" applies.

Numbers divisible by 2. That "rule" applies.

Numbers less than 9. That "rule" applies.

Numbers that divide evenly into 24. That "rule" applies.

They can list any freakin' rule they want and I'm sure you and the other nerds would think it proves something when you and everyone else gives the "wrong" answer (that just also happens to be a "rule" too... like "doubling numbers"winking smiley. Outside of a classroom experiment in geekdom there is nothing to be learned here.
Re: A short game sheds light on government policy, corporate America and why no one likes to be wrong.
July 24, 2015 01:42AM
Quote
Indy!
Numbers under 10. That "rule" applies.

All even numbers. That "rule" applies.

Numbers divisible by 2. That "rule" applies.

Numbers less than 9. That "rule" applies.

Numbers that divide evenly into 24. That "rule" applies.

They can list any freakin' rule they want and I'm sure you and the other nerds would think it proves something when you and everyone else gives the "wrong" answer (that just also happens to be a "rule" too... like "doubling numbers"winking smiley. Outside of a classroom experiment in geekdom there is nothing to be learned here.

Do I sense a bit of frustration? smiling smiley

Clearly the rule is not "Numbers under 10" because the sequence "3,6,18" obeys the rule and 18 is greater than 10.

Clearly the rule is not "All even numbers" because the sequence "3,6,18" obeys the rule and 3 is not an even number.

Etc.

It's stunning that you haven't guessed the rule yet. In the original study upon which this little game is based I think only 1 participant out of the 29 total participants in the study never guessed the rule.
If you believe the rule is "Cube the previous number" then you would be mistaken. - Dick

That's not the rule I applied in 3 9 27. 2 4 8 is an integer to the first power followed by the same integer to the second power followed by the same integer to the third power. 4 16 64 also works.

There's no way for anyone to guess the rule the writer had in mind, as many rules could apply.



Edited 8 time(s). Last edit at 07/24/2015 08:04AM by Hornswoggle.
There's no way for anyone to guess the rule the writer had in mind, as many rules could apply.

Thanks for the support Hornsy.



Edit: Now please explain to Dick why my "numbers under 10" rule would also work for the sequence 2, 4, 8. He's obviously having trouble here. eye rolling smiley



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 07/24/2015 03:55AM by Indy!.
To be honest, I kind of rushed through the test. Had other things going on here when I took it. I never got around to guessing the rule. So I kinda f'ucked it up.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 07/24/2015 08:07AM by Hornswoggle.
Re: A short game sheds light on government policy, corporate America and why no one likes to be wrong.
July 24, 2015 11:24AM
Quote
Indy!
Read the test again, Curt...

"We’ve chosen a rule that some sequences of three numbers obey — and some do not. Your job is to guess what the rule is."

The cheekiness is in the question itself - we've "chosen" a rule. There are multiple rules that apply - but we're supposed to guess which one they've "chosen" out of the multitude. That's like holding up your hand and saying "I've 'chosen' one of my fingers - can you guess which one?" There is no correct answer because if someone guesses the correct one - you can simply say "that's not it." So "confirmation" means absolutely nothing in the "test".

If you name the rule correctly, how can they say "That's not it" when the answer is at the bottom of the puzzle?

You're just totally not getting this, dude.

The rule is "Any three numbers in ascending order." It's amazing that you never figured that out for yourself.
Re: A short game sheds light on government policy, corporate America and why no one likes to be wrong.
July 24, 2015 10:37PM
Quote
Ponderer
I tested my guess with a couple sequences and it told me they fit the rule. By starting with those specific numbers, they intentionally put a "wrong" idea into people's heads to intentionally throw people off. A wrong idea that they are then told is correct but is still wrong. No matter how many times they tested their guess at the rule, it would have told them it was correct. The quiz actually was tricky. The rule may not have been, but coming to the conclusion they wanted starting from where it did I think was, given the way they set this up. 

I think that it's not so much that people don't like being told "no" as much as it is that people don't generally consider that they may be wrong when their position is continuously confirmed as correct.

Did it never cross your mind to try to disconfirm your guess yourself? Remember, you could have entered any 3-number sequence you wanted as many times as you wanted to enter them. Of course you'll keep getting confirmed answers if you never enter a sequence that breaks the rule -- and that's the point of the article. That's exactly what some people do. They seldom or, worse, never seek out information that might disconfirm their beliefs.

In the puzzle, if you'd only entered a sequence like "2, 4, 6" or "1, 2, 3" or any of an infinite number of other sequences you would also have gotten a "Yes, that sequence obeys the rule" that would have eliminated the hypothesis "Double the previous number" from consideration.

Apparently, however, you never did that. You sought out only confirming instances for your belief (i.e., guess), not disconfirming ones.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 07/24/2015 10:39PM by Dick.
Dick - we GOT it (the first time). We're just not nearly as impressed as you are.

And again - how can I have NOT "figured it out" when (as you pointed out yourself) THEIR rule (out of the MANY that could apply) is right there at the bottom? For a guy who prides himself on being a logical thinker - how does the incredibly EASY stuff keep slipping past you? eye rolling smiley
Re: A short game sheds light on government policy, corporate America and why no one likes to be wrong.
July 25, 2015 12:02AM
So maybe you can clarify what you meant to say when you wrote, "There is no correct answer because if someone guesses the correct one - you can simply say 'that's not it.'"
There are multiple answers that would work as "rules", Dick. Obviously the test creators lead one to believe the answer is the doubling rule - so everyone guess that.

I can create a similar test and I guarantee no matter your answer - it will not be "correct" (even if it conforms to the all the test requirements as the 'doubling rule' correctly applied to the one you posted).
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