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Who wants to go on a one-way trip to Mars?

Posted by Curt Anderson 
Re: Who wants to go on a one-way trip to Mars?
March 01, 2015 01:26AM
It's incredibly pompous and presumptive to accuse these people of "not thinking it through". How the f'uck do you know their thought processes?
Re: Who wants to go on a one-way trip to Mars?
March 01, 2015 01:31AM
There is still MUCH to be worked out regarding this venture. They still have another whole decade to work on it. If they aren't ready by their current target date, I cannot see them going through with it, at least not until they're as confident as they can possibly be that all the kinks have been worked out.
Re: Who wants to go on a one-way trip to Mars?
March 01, 2015 02:18AM
Hornswoggle
"There is still MUCH to be worked out" is close cousin of "not thinking it through". Here is what one rejected contestant finally realized:
Quote

Maybe at first when I applied I was a little bit more enthusiastic and passionate about it. But then along the way, I became more critical toward the project. I really kept thinking about technical issues - though that's not necessarily my background - but more, what would it really mean if people would go and live there and what the ideas are of the organization.

At first I thought, this is a great project and this is possible and we're going to do that. And I still think it is technically possible. But I learned that there are a lot more issues that you have to look at, just from a technical side: living there, and the psychological perspective. I became more aware of the aspects of living on Mars, you could say.

What was one of the biggest technical challenges for the Mars mission that you began to worry about during the selection process?

On the technical side, most of the issues are known already. Living on Mars is, you could say, the easy part. But traveling to Mars is the most dangerous part because there is a lot of radiation. And it's not clear what the effects are on organic life and humans.

But I think more, it's the people who are going there - how will their daily life be? Because in the end you can have all this technology, but you really need to have good thought about how people are going to live there and in what kind of an environment. And how will you prepare people for that? [www.dw.de]
Re: Who wants to go on a one-way trip to Mars?
March 01, 2015 06:51AM
I would do it. How many of you folks are going to do something no one has ever done before? How many of you will go down in history as the first human to step foot on another planet? People sacrifice their lives all the time for dumber sh!t - like fighting a war in Iraq for some ridiculous "protecting our freedomS" fairy tale. Are you kidding me? If the plan sounded feasible - I would do it. Even if you don't make it there - what are the odds you'll ever get a chance just to travel in space? It would be the opportunity of a lifetime - but oh wait - I have to finish my life out on Earth so I can die in a hospice somewhere at the age of 86.

Please. You guys are funny. smiling smiley
Re: Who wants to go on a one-way trip to Mars?
March 01, 2015 07:11AM
"There is still MUCH to be worked out" is close cousin of "not thinking it through". - Curt

Well no. If I were selected for a dangerous mission like this (which is hard to imagine because I'm so much of a chicken about doing dangerous things) I would do so on the condition that if I didn't feel right about it at any point that I would bail out.
Re: Who wants to go on a one-way trip to Mars?
March 01, 2015 07:15AM
Great point, Indy. thumbs up

Sly Stone said it best:

Different strokes for different folks. And so on and so on and scooby dooby dooby.
Re: Who wants to go on a one-way trip to Mars?
March 01, 2015 07:41AM
Quote
Hornswoggle
"There is still MUCH to be worked out" is close cousin of "not thinking it through". - Curt

Well no. If I were selected for a dangerous mission like this (which is hard to imagine because I'm so much of a chicken about doing dangerous things) I would do so on the condition that if I didn't feel right about it at any point that I would bail out.

Your not feeling right about it, is really your thinking it through and concluding the Mars-One scheme doesn't add up. And you'd be correct. The engineers at MIT say Mars One is not feasible. [newsoffice.mit.edu] Not just the rocketry and payload aspects, but the Mars-One plan to grow life-sustaining crops and to collect water on Mars isn't feasible.

Indy,
There are all sorts of things that nobody has ever done before. I don't think that anybody has gone over Niagara Falls locked inside a refrigerator, for example. There must be all sorts of suicidal activities that you put on your bucket list.
Re: Who wants to go on a one-way trip to Mars?
March 02, 2015 06:20AM
The engineers at MIT say Mars One is not feasible. [newsoffice.mit.edu] Not just the rocketry and payload aspects, but the Mars-One plan to grow life-sustaining crops and to collect water on Mars isn't feasible. - Curt

If it turned out that they couldn't get those kind of problems solved, then they would cancel the mission, I'm sure. And if for some weird reason they didn't cancel the mission, I'd bail.
Re: Who wants to go on a one-way trip to Mars?
March 02, 2015 07:06AM
Quote
Hornswoggle
The engineers at MIT say Mars One is not feasible. [newsoffice.mit.edu] Not just the rocketry and payload aspects, but the Mars-One plan to grow life-sustaining crops and to collect water on Mars isn't feasible. - Curt

If it turned out that they couldn't get those kind of problems solved, then they would cancel the mission, I'm sure. And if for some weird reason they didn't cancel the mission, I'd bail.

So we agree, the Mars-One organizers collected application fees from 200,000 applicants, but they don't have a feasible plan to launch the rockets ship, and if they managed that to get people to Mars without them dying en route or soon after they arrive. People paid as much as $80 for 24 chances out of 200,000 to go nowhere. And you're upset that Navy and I say the participants haven't thought this through?

If I thought for a minute the Mars-One organizers weren't entirely cynical about their Mars mission, I'd call it a cockamamie scheme. But they are about as sincere as a reality TV show.
Re: Who wants to go on a one-way trip to Mars?
March 02, 2015 09:02AM
If I were the daredevil type (I'm not - actually I'm almost the opposite) I could see going through the process just in case it all panned out, reserving the right at any time to bail. As long as they aren't locked in and can bail at any time unchallenged, I don't see any disadvantage for the super-adventurous types.



Edited 3 time(s). Last edit at 03/02/2015 09:08AM by Hornswoggle.
Re: Who wants to go on a one-way trip to Mars?
March 03, 2015 07:16AM
We have a guy right here in Ft. Lauderdale who went over Niagara Falls in a water heater - Steve Trotter. True story - he put two water heaters together to form the shell of the "barrel" he used. He's the first guy who went over with a woman - a coed trip - the guy he was supposed to go with chickened out at the last minute and a woman in his entourage joined him on a lark instead. He's also the second guy who survived two trips over the Falls. I met him one time at a sub shop and told him he was the craziest mofo on the planet...

[en.wikipedia.org]

And you haven't changed my mind - I would go to Mars if someone made the offer. Of course. That's a no brainer.
Re: Who wants to go on a one-way trip to Mars?
March 09, 2015 07:32AM
Quote

Neil deGrasse Tyson, famous astrophysicist and host of the new National Geographic show StarTalkTV, is not signing up for that trip.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The problem is that there's a huge difference between the first Europeans who traveled to America and the first humans that would travel to Mars. Even though the pilgrims knew they were also on a one-way trip, when they stepped off the boat they could still breathe the air and the trees were still made of wood so they could repair their ship, Tyson said in an interview in his office at the American Museum of Natural History.

But if you go to Mars you can't breathe the air and you can't just repair your ship — the first thing you’re gonna do is set up a hab module that resembles Earth," Tyson said. "Well then are you really on Mars? No — you’re on Earth on Mars."
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Tyson has a hunch for why Mars One is struggling to find investors:

"If I'm a venture capitalist, I would ask you a series of questions," Tyson said. "I would say:
Is it dangerous? Well, yes.
Will people die? Probably.
How much will it cost? I don't know, but a lot.
What's my return on investment? Nothing.

That’s a quick conversation."
Read more: [www.businessinsider.com]
Re: Who wants to go on a one-way trip to Mars?
March 09, 2015 08:08AM
Well then I guess it's a good thing Neil Armstrong didn't bother asking those questions. smiling bouncing smiley

And quite frankly, I'm a little embarrassed for the other Neil (Tyson) - he's an astrophysicist and yet he's encouraging people to not explore space? Seems a little counterintuitive - don't you think?
Re: Who wants to go on a one-way trip to Mars?
March 09, 2015 08:45AM
But if you go to Mars you can't breathe the air and you can't just repair your ship — the first thing you’re gonna do is set up a hab module that resembles Earth," Tyson said. "Well then are you really on Mars? No — you’re on Earth on Mars."

But any manned mission on Mars would be like that, right?
Re: Who wants to go on a one-way trip to Mars?
March 09, 2015 08:53AM
And quite frankly, I'm a little embarrassed for the other Neil (Tyson) - he's an astrophysicist and yet he's encouraging people to not explore space? Seems a little counterintuitive - don't you think? - Indy

Those were my thoughts.

Neil DeGrasse Tyson is a made-for-TV scientist who IMHO is getting carried away with the celebrity aspect. And being paid many millions to do it.

He's not the final authority on everything scientific. He's just one of probably hundreds of thousands of scientists.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 03/09/2015 08:53AM by Hornswoggle.
Re: Who wants to go on a one-way trip to Mars?
March 09, 2015 09:04AM
Quote
Indy!
And quite frankly, I'm a little embarrassed for the other Neil (Tyson) - he's an astrophysicist and yet he's encouraging people to not explore space? Seems a little counterintuitive - don't you think?

No. He's not discouraging space exploration, he's discouraging people from participating in an ill-conceived, cockamamie and frankly an unethical scheme that will never get off the ground.
Re: Who wants to go on a one-way trip to Mars?
March 09, 2015 09:46AM
You're missing the point Indy and I are making.

But if you go to Mars you can't breathe the air and you can't just repair your ship — the first thing you’re gonna do is set up a hab module that resembles Earth," Tyson said. "Well then are you really on Mars? No — you’re on Earth on Mars."

But any manned mission on Mars would be like that, right?



Edited 3 time(s). Last edit at 03/09/2015 09:51AM by Hornswoggle.
Re: Who wants to go on a one-way trip to Mars?
March 09, 2015 10:14AM
Quote
Hornswoggle
You're missing the point Indy and I are making.

But if you go to Mars you can't breathe the air and you can't just repair your ship — the first thing you’re gonna do is set up a hab module that resembles Earth," Tyson said. "Well then are you really on Mars? No — you’re on Earth on Mars."

But any manned mission on Mars would be like that, right?

Not necessarily. The goal of Mars One appears to be only to send a couple of dozen people to Mars just so can be the first to land (and quickly die) on Mars. They aren't looking for shorter route to the Orient, gold, the Fountain of Youth, land or any other exploratory reason. A real Mars mission of a practical nature would either send a robot (as we are with the Mars Rover) to investigate the planet or a manned mission that planned for the astronauts to make a return trip home. These astronauts wouldn't be starry-eyed neophytes who paid an entry fee but trained scientists who would explore the planet. BTW, I expect that manned space missions to other planets will be rare, as it's more practical to send robots.
Re: Who wants to go on a one-way trip to Mars?
March 09, 2015 11:06AM
A real Mars mission of a practical nature would either send a robot (as we are with the Mars Rover) to investigate the planet or a manned mission that planned for the astronauts to make a return trip home. - Curt

Okay, so you're saying that the missions that Tyson's criticizing are missions where the whole purpose is to see if we'd be able to live there, as opposed to having to stay there out of necessity if for some reason they wanted a personed crew to perform scientific testing. That could be.

But somewhere down the road we're going to experiment with living there. And it's going to look like "a hab module that resembles Earth".



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 03/09/2015 11:51PM by Hornswoggle.
Re: Who wants to go on a one-way trip to Mars?
March 10, 2015 01:48AM
That's funny - you think looking for the (mythical) Fountain of Youth is a more honorable pursuit than sending the first people to Mars, Curt? smiling smiley

And Hornsy's right - no matter when we send people to Mars (which - btw - should have been years ago imho) - they're going to live in some kind of bubble. And when they go outside, they're going to wear some kind of spacesuit - just like on the moon. Obviously we can't breath or survive in the Mars atmosphere. One reason to send people instead of robots - btw - is that people can do a lot of things robots can't. We could send people up there to take specific samples from specific areas for specific reasons. They could then send those samples back to Earth with probes they take up with them.

And again - so far as dying in the process? A lot of people died trying to find America - that was considered a suicide mission to the naysayers back in the day. the Japanese just sent a bunch of people on suicide missions to shut down the Fukishima reactor when it was flooded. We sent guys into Pakistan on a possible suicide mission to get bin Laden. The first pilots who flew heavier than air planes were in some respects on suicide missions. So I don't see why you think this is something new or out of the ordinary, Curt. It's part of the human experience - especially in regards to exploration or trying something previously new or unknown to mankind. That is how we move forward.

And again - I'm not wavering at all. If I had the opportunity to go to Mars - even if it meant dying on the way (or even on the launch pad) - I would embrace that opportunity.
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