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"Blurring the lines is an act of faithfulness"

Posted by Kairos 
Re: "Blurring the lines is an act of faithfulness"
November 19, 2014 05:50AM
From everything I've heard - STV was basically a hands-off thank you gift to Shatner. He wanted to direct, so everyone took a step back and let him fall on his face.

There's no reason to see Insurrection unless you have 2 extra hours of life you don't mind wasting. Motion Picture was a good idea, but they overworked it. The comparison would be when you really want to please somebody and you say everything wrong because you're nervous. Roddenberry had been away too long and tried too hard to hit a home run - he overdid it by treating the franchise with too much reverence.


Pondy -

The Nexus scene - the way I remember it (disclaimer: it has been awhile) - is that it was an accurate depiction of his life on Earth. Ergo, while it was a dream (or fantasy) - it represented reality as he knew it. Otherwise he would not have been tempted by it. If it were just some fantasy - he would not feel a connection. So far as how "religious" - it's Christmas. smiling smiley But I'm not saying religion played a large part in the series. Roddenberry was not religious - I know that for a fact. So it's no surprise it didn't play a large part in the series. However - most of the crew was from Earth - and religion exists on Earth, so...
Re: "Blurring the lines is an act of faithfulness"
November 19, 2014 07:12AM
The Motion Picture was just boring.

Shatner directed Star Trek V? That makes sense.

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"Build yourselves a wall of ships!" said the Oracle!
Re: "Blurring the lines is an act of faithfulness"
November 19, 2014 07:55AM
Motion Picture should have spent more time on the characters and story and less time on masturbation material for the fan base. They must have spent a good 5 minutes of screen time just showing you every freakin' angle of the Enterprise the first time it's on screen. Plus it's basically just a reworking of an episode from the original series. Ironically, I read the original story line for MP was supposed to be something similar to STV - the Enterprise meets god. Allegedly the studio nixed it because they thought it wouldn't play well with the public.
Re: "Blurring the lines is an act of faithfulness"
November 19, 2014 08:51AM
Yeah I noted the parallels too on the god angle. There was a bit of that which continued in the plot as the Voyager space craft was sort of worshipped.

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"Build yourselves a wall of ships!" said the Oracle!
Re: "Blurring the lines is an act of faithfulness"
November 19, 2014 05:02PM
"The Nexus scene - the way I remember it (disclaimer: it has been awhile) - is that it was an accurate depiction of his life on Earth. Ergo, while it was a dream (or fantasy) - it represented reality as he knew it." -Indy!

I saw it as representing life as he dreamed it could be for him. I'm not denying that people could still be way into antiques and the Victorian era several centuries from now, but it totally struck me as a fantasy specific to Picard that may have not been necessarily representative of the society as a whole at the time. His character always had a penchant for that era and for history as a whole. It did not seem far fetched to me that if he suddenly got to have his deepest wish, which is what the Nexus supposedly put you in, that he would want to live in another era, or at least an era based on an earlier one. If it wasn't for the way his "sons" were dressed, you couldn't tell that he wasn't totally back in a long previous time. I saw that scene as representing Picard more than it did the entire planet at the time.





Re: "Blurring the lines is an act of faithfulness"
November 19, 2014 07:22PM
Not sure I understand the difference - no matter which period or whether fantasy or not, religion is still clearly represented in the Christmas/holiday trappings. That was the original point - that religion was represented on ST.

Out of curiosity, I revisited the scene via Youtube...

[www.youtube.com]

It's clearly a fantasy, but also taking place (as least in some respects) in Picard's time. There are all kinds of contemporary electric doodads around the house - lights on the tree, etc.. and the boy's present is a model fighter jet. The bigger question for me? Why does everyone - including Picard - have a pronounced British accent when he allegedly grew up in France?
Re: "Blurring the lines is an act of faithfulness"
November 19, 2014 09:38PM
I don't think that whole scenario was very well thought out. It came across as Picard wishing he lived in a Dickens novel.

Re: "Blurring the lines is an act of faithfulness"
November 19, 2014 09:58PM
Picard is named after a French astronomer.

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"Build yourselves a wall of ships!" said the Oracle!
Re: "Blurring the lines is an act of faithfulness"
November 20, 2014 01:27AM
I'm almost positive he talks about growing up in France at different points throughout the series.

I agree Pondy - most of that movie was ill conceived imho.
Re: "Blurring the lines is an act of faithfulness"
November 28, 2014 08:01AM
There is also a region of France called Picardy.

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"Build yourselves a wall of ships!" said the Oracle!
Anonymous User
Re: "Blurring the lines is an act of faithfulness"
November 28, 2014 12:19PM
Quote
Kairos
Can anyone even come close to making sense out of that schizoid statement? (apology to schizophrenics). That was written on the daily sign outside the local church. Keep in mind this the place where people actually vote here...

Doesn't blurring the lines mean snorting cocaine? Or does the phrase have some other meaning I don't know about?
Re: "Blurring the lines is an act of faithfulness"
November 28, 2014 12:32PM
Never heard it used in that context before. Blurring the lines means making everything fuzzy and uncertain.

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"Build yourselves a wall of ships!" said the Oracle!
Re: "Blurring the lines is an act of faithfulness"
November 28, 2014 08:49PM
The lines don't blur when you snort cocaine - they disappear up your nose.
Re: "Blurring the lines is an act of faithfulness"
November 29, 2014 12:49AM
Yeah that's what I thought.

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"Build yourselves a wall of ships!" said the Oracle!
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