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"Blurring the lines is an act of faithfulness"

Posted by Kairos 
"Blurring the lines is an act of faithfulness"
October 21, 2014 02:07AM
Can anyone even come close to making sense out of that schizoid statement? (apology to schizophrenics). That was written on the daily sign outside the local church. Keep in mind this the place where people actually vote here...

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"Build yourselves a wall of ships!" said the Oracle!



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 10/21/2014 02:07AM by Kairos.
Re: "Blurring the lines is an act of faithfulness"
October 21, 2014 03:57AM
I think it means something like... You don't need to know hard and fast facts about a situation or something or be specific about it. Assuming that you know enough to separate or join whatever it is to whatever else you want to separate or join it to for your purposes is what faith is all about. Being imprecise or fuzzy or means you have faith that the details don't matter and are not important to you.

It would help a tad to know what lines they were referring to. The lines between church and state maybe...? I'd love to know what they meant.

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Re: "Blurring the lines is an act of faithfulness"
October 21, 2014 04:14AM
I think that's the catch, you're supposed to actually go to their service to figure it out.

They use that tactic in zen too confuse the hell out of people until they actually listen to their new master. I heard it came up in the Patty Hearst case or something.

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"Build yourselves a wall of ships!" said the Oracle!
Re: "Blurring the lines is an act of faithfulness"
October 24, 2014 04:51PM
Zen?

============================================================================

*Sanders 2016*

"And these children that you spit on
As they try to change their worlds
Are immune to your consultations
They're quite aware of what they're going through"
Re: "Blurring the lines is an act of faithfulness"
October 25, 2014 09:07AM
Yeah its called a koan.

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"Build yourselves a wall of ships!" said the Oracle!
Re: "Blurring the lines is an act of faithfulness"
October 28, 2014 11:02PM
It means "Don't worry about that scientific stuff".
Re: "Blurring the lines is an act of faithfulness"
October 29, 2014 02:27AM
Don't worry about everything in reality that contradicts this 3000 year old book, just keep coming and you'll be faithful regardless.

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"Build yourselves a wall of ships!" said the Oracle!
Re: "Blurring the lines is an act of faithfulness"
November 16, 2014 12:25PM


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"Build yourselves a wall of ships!" said the Oracle!
Re: "Blurring the lines is an act of faithfulness"
November 16, 2014 07:06PM
Re: "Blurring the lines is an act of faithfulness"
November 18, 2014 01:53AM
They have different religions on Star Trek - they're just using the old sci-fi cover and giving them different names so no one will get upset and boycott the show.
Re: "Blurring the lines is an act of faithfulness"
November 18, 2014 02:18AM
Examples? The only religions that appear in the show are the freak colonists they encounter whose experiment ends up turning into a form of Jonestown.

The Mark of Gideon was a really good anti-religious episode.

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"Build yourselves a wall of ships!" said the Oracle!
Re: "Blurring the lines is an act of faithfulness"
November 18, 2014 02:51AM
I don't recall any mention of religions on Earth in the era Star Trek takes place.

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Re: "Blurring the lines is an act of faithfulness"
November 18, 2014 08:44AM
Gene Roddenberry was a secular humanist by most accounts so he wasn't big on religion in the show. However - there were plenty of episodes and themes dealing with religion. If you want an example of religion on Earth - look no farther than your favorite ST movie, Pondy... Generations. When Picard enters the Nexus - he ends up back with his family celebrating Christmas... tree, ornaments, the whole nine yards. I believe there is also one episode of STNG where they mention a Christmas party in passing as well. Roddenberry might have been dead by then - he died about halfway thru STNG. By Generations, he was definitely gone so they might not have been as tight about it by then. There are other religious examples too... Bajorans from Deep Sleep Nine had some sort of religious deal going (don't remember the details because I didn't like that series). In the original ST there was the episode where they worshipped the guy they thought was the son of god - "The Son" - which Spock confused with sun worshippers when he first heard the name (interesting that because - if I remember right - Roddenberry's wife played the crew member who fell in love with the "son"winking smiley. In Star Trek V - the movie Shatner directed - the entire story revolves around some religious sect or cult that hijacks the Enterprise so they can go meet god. There are episodes where the Klingons refer to Kahless (or Kah-less?) who is some sort of god to them as well. You'll see other stuff if you pay attention - there's a chapel on board the ship (if memory serves) for example.
Re: "Blurring the lines is an act of faithfulness"
November 18, 2014 10:22AM
Star Trek V = Worst Star Trek movie ever. OK is a stiff competition with The Motion Picture and Insurrection, but I haven't seen the latter.

My guess is that Roddenberry actually didn't have much to do with Star Trek V.

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"Build yourselves a wall of ships!" said the Oracle!
Re: "Blurring the lines is an act of faithfulness"
November 18, 2014 04:19PM
How "religious" were the depictions of Christmas that you mentioned though, Indy!? And that scene of Picard in the Nexis was a depiction of something that didn't even exist. It was more like a dream. I'm still trying to recall any depiction of religion on Earth in any ST episode or film. Granted, they didn't tend to spend much time on that planet.

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Re: "Blurring the lines is an act of faithfulness"
November 19, 2014 05:50AM
From everything I've heard - STV was basically a hands-off thank you gift to Shatner. He wanted to direct, so everyone took a step back and let him fall on his face.

There's no reason to see Insurrection unless you have 2 extra hours of life you don't mind wasting. Motion Picture was a good idea, but they overworked it. The comparison would be when you really want to please somebody and you say everything wrong because you're nervous. Roddenberry had been away too long and tried too hard to hit a home run - he overdid it by treating the franchise with too much reverence.


Pondy -

The Nexus scene - the way I remember it (disclaimer: it has been awhile) - is that it was an accurate depiction of his life on Earth. Ergo, while it was a dream (or fantasy) - it represented reality as he knew it. Otherwise he would not have been tempted by it. If it were just some fantasy - he would not feel a connection. So far as how "religious" - it's Christmas. smiling smiley But I'm not saying religion played a large part in the series. Roddenberry was not religious - I know that for a fact. So it's no surprise it didn't play a large part in the series. However - most of the crew was from Earth - and religion exists on Earth, so...
Re: "Blurring the lines is an act of faithfulness"
November 19, 2014 07:12AM
The Motion Picture was just boring.

Shatner directed Star Trek V? That makes sense.

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"Build yourselves a wall of ships!" said the Oracle!
Re: "Blurring the lines is an act of faithfulness"
November 19, 2014 07:55AM
Motion Picture should have spent more time on the characters and story and less time on masturbation material for the fan base. They must have spent a good 5 minutes of screen time just showing you every freakin' angle of the Enterprise the first time it's on screen. Plus it's basically just a reworking of an episode from the original series. Ironically, I read the original story line for MP was supposed to be something similar to STV - the Enterprise meets god. Allegedly the studio nixed it because they thought it wouldn't play well with the public.
Re: "Blurring the lines is an act of faithfulness"
November 19, 2014 08:51AM
Yeah I noted the parallels too on the god angle. There was a bit of that which continued in the plot as the Voyager space craft was sort of worshipped.

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"Build yourselves a wall of ships!" said the Oracle!
Re: "Blurring the lines is an act of faithfulness"
November 19, 2014 05:02PM
"The Nexus scene - the way I remember it (disclaimer: it has been awhile) - is that it was an accurate depiction of his life on Earth. Ergo, while it was a dream (or fantasy) - it represented reality as he knew it." -Indy!

I saw it as representing life as he dreamed it could be for him. I'm not denying that people could still be way into antiques and the Victorian era several centuries from now, but it totally struck me as a fantasy specific to Picard that may have not been necessarily representative of the society as a whole at the time. His character always had a penchant for that era and for history as a whole. It did not seem far fetched to me that if he suddenly got to have his deepest wish, which is what the Nexus supposedly put you in, that he would want to live in another era, or at least an era based on an earlier one. If it wasn't for the way his "sons" were dressed, you couldn't tell that he wasn't totally back in a long previous time. I saw that scene as representing Picard more than it did the entire planet at the time.





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