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Occupy Wall Street - Why it's important

Posted by PowerToThePeople 
Occupy Wall Street - Why it's important
September 27, 2011 03:09AM
I just got back from Immokalee, Florida where the Coalition of Immokalee Workers are about to begin a huge campaign against supermarkets like Trader Joe’s, Stop & Shop, Giant, which is extremely important because if it exceeds, it will probably double the wages which run between about eight and ten thousand dollars for agricultural workers in the tomato fields who live in horrific conditions at best, and at worst conditions that resemble slavery.

But, I’ve been following what’s been happening here, and this is really where the hope of America lies. And all of the efforts of intimidation that we’ve seen by the police in New York – the disproportionate amount of force and the disproportionate numbers that have been deployed to contain the protests here -- for me illustrate that the real people who are scared are the power elite. Of course they’re trying to make you scared and us scared, but I can tell you after having been a reporter for the New York Times, on the inside they’re very, very frightened. They do not want movements like this to grow. And they understand on some level, whether it’s subconscious or in other cases even overt, that the criminal class in this country has seized power; that those people in this plaza, those people carrying out these protests, in the true sort of definition of the political spectrum, are conservatives in this sense: they call for the rule of law; they call for the restoration of the rule of law. And what’s happened is that the real radicals have seized power, and they are decimating all legal impediments to the creation of a neo-feudalistic corporate state, one in which there is a rapacious oligarchic class, a thin managerial elite. And two-thirds of this country live in conditions that increasingly push families to subsistence levels.

And one of the reasons that I went to Immokalee, and the reasons Immokalee is important, is because in this race to the bottom, Immokalee is the bottom. It’s where they want the working and even the middle class to end up, and that is, a place where they have no rights, where because of massive unemployment and work that is part-time, poorly paid work, they can reduce the working class to a status equivalent to serfdom, where there are no pensions, no health benefits. Collective bargaining in Florida is illegal, a legacy of Jim Crow. And Immokalee isn’t just a horrific pocket of essentially third world abuse, but is a vision of what the corporate state wants to impose on the rest of us. And what they want is for us to remain passive and to remain frightened. And as long as we remain passive and frightened, entranced with their electronic hallucinations, we are not a threat. The moment people come out and do this, the corporate state is terrified. And if you doubt me, look around me at the huge numbers of cops, and not only that, but the kind of brutality that the cops have visited on peaceful protestors.

Video (part 1 of 6) at [www.youtube.com]

Related reading: Tomatoes of Wrath [www.truthdig.com]

***

"When they say there’s not enough money, they mean there’s not enough money for YOU." - Jill Stein, Green Party presidential nominee.
Re: Occupy Wall Street - Why it's important
September 27, 2011 04:04AM
Google visitors - please feel free to add your comments here.
Re: Occupy Wall Street - Why it's important
September 27, 2011 04:32AM
Tell ya what - you want to see poverty, hang out in Immokalee or Pahokee or any of those areas in the center of the state where agriculture is the main business. There are really only 3 industries up there... sugar cane, drugs and prostitution. Like a lot of the dark side of life, when it comes to the plantations - Indy knows more than he should and far more than the authorities want him to. smoking smiley
Anonymous User
Re: Occupy Wall Street - Why it's important
September 27, 2011 08:28PM
Indy! Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> There are really only 3 industries
> up there... sugar cane, drugs and prostitution.
> Like a lot of the dark side of life, when it comes
> to the plantations - Indy knows more than he
> should and far more than the authorities want him
> to. smoking smiley


Tell us that story Uncle Indy!
Re: Occupy Wall Street - Why it's important
September 27, 2011 09:19PM
I used to work at a Jamaican bakery (thanks to Ronald Reagan smoking smiley ) and one of my duties was to drive truckloads of bread up to the sugar plantations in Palm Beach county. And believe me, when I say "plantation" - I mean PLANTATION. The workers had grueling shifts in the hot sun cutting cane as the fields burned right next to them - hot, humid, smoke in your face, soot all over... They lived in barracks on the plantation where a commissary owned by the sugar barons sold them overpriced crap to take the money they just earned right back out of their pocket (like the old mine worker stores except they used real money). That's where I delivered the bread. Inside, where the sugar is manufactured - you'd don't want to know what happens to that sugar you're eating. First off, they're supposed to wash the cane in hot water to kill all the bugs, germs, etc..., but they only use hot water when the inspector is there. They have warehouses with MOUNTAINS of sugar. Imagine a hockey arena with a huge mountain of sugar inside - guys right out of the field covered in soot from the cane fires with boots filled with swamp mud climbing up and down them. Yes. And of course the barons themselves are crooked beyond belief - they've gamed the system so sugar from other countries have tariffs applied to make it more expensive to import it and the Florida guys keep their cushy con game going (and we pay more than we should for sugar - which is in basically everything we eat). It was a virtual slave situation there. They would bring Jamaicans in from the island, have them work the limit of their 6 month work visa - then fly them back to Jamaica. The plane would sit on the tarmac and they'd pass out liquor and girls and stay right there for the necessary 3 days to renew the visa then fly them back to Belle Glade and put them back to work. So these guys ended up partying most of their money away and spending the rest on hookers.

Now I know what you're thinking - how does Indy know all this? Very simple - those guys loved me. The best day of the week for them was when Indy showed up with the sour dough bread. If they were working close to the road and they saw me coming in the bread truck - they would literally start cheering - whooping and hollering and dancing - they LOVED that bread. The times I was there after hours they would take me to these open air flea markets where all the workers in the town gathered and made food, got high and sold all kinds of cool flea market type items. I was like a mascot to them - the only white guy AND the Yummy delivery dude. So they would feed me kickass Jamaican foods, drink Guinness Stout, smoke spliffs - AND tell me everything about their business and working the fields. Seriously - you wouldn't believe how much street cred being the bakery guy earns you. One guy would introduce me... "Dis is da YUMMY bakery guy, mon. He makes da bread!" Boom light up a huge spliff - let's party with the bread guy! Or free food or beer - all night long. I was high as kite coming out of there and then I had to drive the truck another two hours to get home.

Anyway - like all good things it eventually had to end. The workers stood up for their rights eventually and the sugar barons replaced them with heavy machinery. All we have left are the memories... listening to Dennis Brown, Peter Tosh and Yellowman... smoking a spliff... ahhhh the good old days...
Re: Occupy Wall Street - Why it's important
September 27, 2011 09:25PM
Great story. thumbs up
Re: Occupy Wall Street - Why it's important
September 27, 2011 09:41PM
Thanks. Great times. You never know how good you had it until you're looking back on it. smileys with beer
Re: Occupy Wall Street - Why it's important
September 27, 2011 09:42PM
Oh man, that's so true.
Re: Occupy Wall Street - Why it's important
September 27, 2011 11:11PM
Truthdig re-published all 6 parts of the interview with Chris Hedges at Occupy Wall Street and cleaned up the audio.

See [www.truthdig.com]

***

"When they say there’s not enough money, they mean there’s not enough money for YOU." - Jill Stein, Green Party presidential nominee.
Re: Occupy Wall Street - Why it's important
September 29, 2011 11:31PM
Outstanding segment from Lawrence O'Donnell.

Interview with Michael Moore from Wall Street.

Go to [readersupportednews.org]

It's the video right above Michael Moore: "Rise Up, Everyone"

This movement isn't going away. It will continue to grow and sweep across the nation.

I need to start watching Lawrence O'Donnell again. Love his emotion - Ed's, too.

In contrast, Rachel's Maddow is devoid of emotion, which is why I hardly watch her program anymore.

Anyhow, watch the segment. If it doesn't pump you up, nothing will.

And get involved. If you can, pry yourself away from this forum. I should talk, huh? Well at least I recognize my own inaction. That's the first step. Now I need to take it to the streets. Forums like this are great for communication, but real activism can only take place in person, with your body.

This is the rebellion many here have been waiting for.

The October 2011 action at Freedom Plaza in Washington, DC will be a great compliment, the other half of our 1-2 punch against the American corporatocracy. If you can't be there, promote it.

Take care, and keep the fight.

Peace.

***

"When they say there’s not enough money, they mean there’s not enough money for YOU." - Jill Stein, Green Party presidential nominee.
Re: Occupy Wall Street - Why it's important
September 30, 2011 12:03AM
Saw Lawrence last night - nice piece although I worry whenever Michael Moore steps in. He's a lightning rod for the right. This Wall Street thing really hits all sides - polarizing the debate would be a mistake.

I think the Freedom Plaza thing is already happening on Wall Street.
Re: Occupy Wall Street - Why it's important
September 30, 2011 01:58AM
If you're a lightning rod for the right, it means that you're being effective and that they're frightened of you.
Re: Occupy Wall Street - Why it's important
September 30, 2011 02:00AM
Why I Was Maced at the Wall Street Protests

My boyfriend Frank and I are heading toward Liberty Square to check out what's going on at the Occupy Wall Street protest, when we stumble upon the afternoon march toward Union Square. So we join up and walk along behind. The crowd looks like maybe 300 people, mostly punk-styled kids and folks carrying their computers (for live streaming, we found out later) and some aging-hippie types. People are beating drums, blowing whistles, carrying signs, and chanting: "Banks got bailed out, you got sold out!" and "We are the 99 percent!" and "All day, all week, occupy Wall Street!" and of course the classic "This is what democracy looks like!"

All in all, it starts out as a pretty good time. There are police, but for the most part they are walking behind the group casually, just beat cops bantering and laughing, keeping an eye on things. There are around 30 of them. We reach Union Square, circle it a couple times, and join the human microphone. The human microphone consists of one person speaking or shouting, and then everyone within earshot repeating, thus, a human amplifier, albeit with some delay. After about fifteen minutes, we are on the move again, the crowd spurred toward the United Nations by the messages transmitted from the human microphone.

As we circle Union Square, about twenty NYPD officers haul out orange plastic nets (the kind used to fence off construction sites) and close off the road, diverting the crowd. But the detour, too, is closed, leaving us only one option: straight down Broadway. The lighthearted carnival air begins to get very heavy as it becomes clear that we are being corralled. The main group, about 150 protesters, keeps on down the street, but the police are running behind with the orange nets, siphoning off groups of fifteen to twenty people at a time, classic crowd control.

A new group of police officers arrives in white shirts, as opposed to dark blue. These guys are completely undiscerning in their aggression. If someone gets in their way, they shove them headfirst into the nearest parked car, at which point the officers are immediately surrounded by camera phones and shouts of "Shame! Shame!"

Up until this point, Frank and I have managed to stay ahead of the nets, but as we hit what I think is 12th Street, they've caught up. The blue-shirts aren't being too forceful, so we manage to run free, but stay behind to see what happens. Then things go nuts.

The white-shirted cops are shouting at us to get off the street as they corral us onto the sidewalk. One African American man gets on the curb but refuses to be pushed up against the wall of the building; they throw him into the street, and five cops tackle him. As he's being cuffed, a white kid with a video camera asks him "What's your name?! What's your name?!" One of the blue-shirted cops thinks he's too close and gives him a little shove. A white-shirt sees this, grabs the kid and without hesitation billy-clubs him in the stomach.

At this point, the crowd of twenty or so caught in the orange fence is shouting "Shame! Shame! Who are you protecting?! YOU are the 99 percent! You're fighting your own people!" A white-shirt, now known to be NYPD Deputy Inspector Anthony Bologna, comes from the left, walks straight up to the three young girls at the front of the crowd, and pepper-sprays them in the face for a few seconds, continuing as they scream "No! Why are you doing that?!" The rest of us in the crowd turn away from the spray, but it's unavoidable. My left eye burns and goes blind and tears start streaming down my face. Frank grabs my arm and shoves us through the small gap between the orange fence and the brick wall while everyone stares in shock and horror at the two girls on the ground and two more doubled over screaming as their eyes ooze. In the street I shout for water to rinse my eyes or give to the girls on the ground, but no one responds. One of the blue-shirts, tall and bald, stares in disbelief and says, "I can't believe he just f^ckin' maced her." And it becomes clear that the white-shirts are a different species. We need to get out of there.

The other end of the street is also closed off, and we are trapped on this one block along with about twenty frustrated pedestrians. My eye is killing me and I'm crying, partially from the pain and partially from the shock of the violence displayed by these police. A shirtless young "medic" with ripped cargo shorts, matted brown hair, and two plastic bottles slung around his neck runs up to me and says, "Did you get pepper sprayed? Okay here, tilt your head to the side, this isn't going to feel great," at which point he squirts one of the plastic bottles of white liquid into my left eye, then tilts my head the other way and does the other eye, then repeats with water. Then he unties the white bandanna from his wrist and wipes my eyes with it saying, "You'll be okay, this is my grandfather's bandanna, he got through Korea with it, and if he got through that, then you're going to get through this. Just keep blinking." Thanks to the treatment - liquid antacid, pepper-spray antidote - the burning behind my eyes subsides.

A woman with two little girls in tow walks up to a cop at the end of the block and explains that they just need to get to ballet, but he won't let them through. The woman seems to accept this, turns to the girls, thinks for a second, then marches straight to the edge of the fence at the corner of the building. A different officer sees them coming and, understanding their situation, lets them through. So Frank and I bolt for the same opening and escape.

The farther away we get, the more normal everyone starts to look. People have no clue about what's happening just five or six blocks down. Frank and I say maybe two words to each other the whole five-hour bus ride home.

Just for the record, I love cops. I do, my mother worked in the justice system for 30 years, and I've known a lot of really good cops, really good honorable people just doing their jobs. I've never agreed with the sentiment, "F^ck the Po-lice," and I still don't. But these guys are f^cked up. There was an anger in those white-shirt's eyes that said, "You don't matter." And whether they were just scared or irrational or looking for a target for their rage, there was no excuse for their abuse of authority. I had always thought that people who complained about police brutality must have done something to provoke it, that surely cops wouldn't hurt people without a really good reason. But they do. We were on the curb, we were contained, we were unarmed. Pepper spray hurts like hell, and the experience only makes me wish I'd done something more to deserve it.

[readersupportednews.org]

***

"When they say there’s not enough money, they mean there’s not enough money for YOU." - Jill Stein, Green Party presidential nominee.
Re: Occupy Wall Street - Why it's important
September 30, 2011 02:15AM
PowerToThePeople Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> If you're a lightning rod for the right, it means
> that you're being effective and that they're
> frightened of you.


It also means you're divisive. Personally, I believe this is an issue some people on the right will get behind. Add Moore to the mix, polarize the debate and chances are it becomes just another left vs. right "issue" and all momentum is lost.

But that's jmho.
Re: Occupy Wall Street - Why it's important
September 30, 2011 05:15AM
I don't think that Michael Moore's vociferous support of Occupy Wall Street is going to dissuade anyone from joining the movement. If Michael Moore is the sole reason that someone decides not to join the movement, then we probably don't want that person in the movement anyhow.
Anonymous User
Re: Occupy Wall Street - Why it's important
September 30, 2011 05:50AM
What is frightening to me is the heavy handed police, which is a nice name for police brutality. I saw it of course in the 60s but one could almost expect that the police would react to the anti war demonstrations. This tactic that first became evident in SEattle was the corporate oligarchy using the police to silence disent and that is all it is. Any illusions about who the police work for should be answered by now. We have or at least are well on our way to beccoming a proto fascist state
Re: Occupy Wall Street - Why it's important
September 30, 2011 06:03AM
And as the economy continues to unravel, as the protests grow into a full rebellion, it will become more and more evident that we're descending into a sort of totalitarianism or proto-fascism. In his excellent book Democracy Incorporated, political philosopher Sheldon Wolin argues that we're already in a state of inverted totalitarianism,and that it could morph into full-blown classical totalitarianism.

***

"When they say there’s not enough money, they mean there’s not enough money for YOU." - Jill Stein, Green Party presidential nominee.
Re: Occupy Wall Street - Why it's important
September 30, 2011 06:05AM
I can see Bill O'Reilly doing the Michael Moore / Occupy Wall Street interview already.
Re: Occupy Wall Street - Why it's important
September 30, 2011 06:06AM
What do you care what Bill O'Reilly says?
Re: Occupy Wall Street - Why it's important
October 01, 2011 09:48PM
photos of the crowds - [www.zerohedge.com]

looks pretty sweet smiling smiley

gives me chills

the 99.99 is gaining traction versus the .01

==============================================================================

"The masses... do not conceive any ideas, sound or unsound. They only choose between the ideologies developed by the intellectual leaders of mankind. But their choice is final and determines the course of events. If they prefer bad doctrines, nothing can prevent disaster."
Anonymous User
Re: Occupy Wall Street - Why it's important
October 01, 2011 10:01PM
GAMBLING: Mr. Mayor, let’s talk about Zuccoti Park and the protesters. How do you end that thing?

BLOOMBERG: The protesters are protesting against people who make $40-50,000 a year and are struggling to make ends meet. That’s the bottom line. Those are the people that work on Wall Street or on the finance sector. [...] People in this day and age need support for their employers. We need the banks, if the banks don’t go out and make loans we will not come out of our economy problems, we will not have jobs. And so anything we can do to responsibly help the banks do that, encourage them to do that is waht we need. I think we spend much too much time worrying about how we got into problems as to how we go forward. [...] Also we always tend to blame the wrong people. We blame the banks. They were part of it, but so were Frddie Mac and Frannie Mae and Congress.

[thinkprogress.org]
Re: Occupy Wall Street - Why it's important
October 01, 2011 10:53PM
I'm heading up to Occupy L.A. within the hour. I'll be reporting on it.

The Best Among Us

http://www.truthdig.com/images/eartothegrounduploads/AP110926034155-300.jpg

There are no excuses left. Either you join the revolt taking place on Wall Street and in the financial districts of other cities across the country or you stand on the wrong side of history. Either you obstruct, in the only form left to us, which is civil disobedience, the plundering by the criminal class on Wall Street and accelerated destruction of the ecosystem that sustains the human species, or become the passive enabler of a monstrous evil. Either you taste, feel and smell the intoxication of freedom and revolt or sink into the miasma of despair and apathy. Either you are a rebel or a slave.

To be declared innocent in a country where the rule of law means nothing, where we have undergone a corporate coup, where the poor and working men and women are reduced to joblessness and hunger, where war, financial speculation and internal surveillance are the only real business of the state, where even habeas corpus no longer exists, where you, as a citizen, are nothing more than a commodity to corporate systems of power, one to be used and discarded, is to be complicit in this radical evil. To stand on the sidelines and say “I am innocent” is to bear the mark of Cain; it is to do nothing to reach out and help the weak, the oppressed and the suffering, to save the planet. To be innocent in times like these is to be a criminal. Ask Tim DeChristopher.

Choose. But choose fast. The state and corporate forces are determined to crush this. They are not going to wait for you. They are terrified this will spread. They have their long phalanxes of police on motorcycles, their rows of white paddy wagons, their foot soldiers hunting for you on the streets with pepper spray and orange plastic nets. They have their metal barricades set up on every single street leading into the New York financial district, where the mandarins in Brooks Brothers suits use your money, money they stole from you, to gamble and speculate and gorge themselves while one in four children outside those barricades depend on food stamps to eat. Speculation in the 17th century was a crime. Speculators were hanged. Today they run the state and the financial markets. They disseminate the lies that pollute our airwaves. They know, even better than you, how pervasive the corruption and theft have become, how gamed the system is against you, how corporations have cemented into place a thin oligarchic class and an obsequious cadre of politicians, judges and journalists who live in their little gated Versailles while 6 million Americans are thrown out of their homes, a number soon to rise to 10 million, where a million people a year go bankrupt because they cannot pay their medical bills and 45,000 die from lack of proper care, where real joblessness is spiraling to over 20 percent, where the citizens, including students, spend lives toiling in debt peonage, working dead-end jobs, when they have jobs, a world devoid of hope, a world of masters and serfs.

The only word these corporations know is more. They are disemboweling every last social service program funded by the taxpayers, from education to Social Security, because they want that money themselves. Let the sick die. Let the poor go hungry. Let families be tossed in the street. Let the unemployed rot. Let children in the inner city or rural wastelands learn nothing and live in misery and fear. Let the students finish school with no jobs and no prospects of jobs. Let the prison system, the largest in the industrial world, expand to swallow up all potential dissenters. Let torture continue. Let teachers, police, firefighters, postal employees and social workers join the ranks of the unemployed. Let the roads, bridges, dams, levees, power grids, rail lines, subways, bus services, schools and libraries crumble or close. Let the rising temperatures of the planet, the freak weather patterns, the hurricanes, the droughts, the flooding, the tornadoes, the melting polar ice caps, the poisoned water systems, the polluted air increase until the species dies.

Who the hell cares? If the stocks of ExxonMobil or the coal industry or Goldman Sachs are high, life is good. Profit. Profit. Profit. That is what they chant behind those metal barricades. They have their fangs deep into your necks. If you do not shake them off very, very soon they will kill you. And they will kill the ecosystem, dooming your children and your children’s children. They are too stupid and too blind to see that they will perish with the rest of us. So either you rise up and supplant them, either you dismantle the corporate state, for a world of sanity, a world where we no longer kneel before the absurd idea that the demands of financial markets should govern human behavior, or we are frog-marched toward self-annihilation.

Those on the streets around Wall Street are the physical embodiment of hope. They know that hope has a cost, that it is not easy or comfortable, that it requires self-sacrifice and discomfort and finally faith. They sleep on concrete every night. Their clothes are soiled. They have eaten more bagels and peanut butter than they ever thought possible. They have tasted fear, been beaten, gone to jail, been blinded by pepper spray, cried, hugged each other, laughed, sung, talked too long in general assemblies, seen their chants drift upward to the office towers above them, wondered if it is worth it, if anyone cares, if they will win. But as long as they remain steadfast they point the way out of the corporate labyrinth. This is what it means to be alive. They are the best among us.

- Chris Hedges [www.truthdig.com]

Click here to access OCCUPY TOGETHER, a hub for all of the events springing up across the country in solidarity with Occupy Wall St.

***

"When they say there’s not enough money, they mean there’s not enough money for YOU." - Jill Stein, Green Party presidential nominee.
Anonymous User
Re: Occupy Wall Street - Why it's important
October 01, 2011 10:55PM
Can't wait to read your report!

Have fun.
Re: Occupy Wall Street - Why it's important
October 02, 2011 07:39AM
cops use their nets to arrest 700+ protestors in nyc - [www.reuters.com]

bernanke, sitting in one of the fed's 40 lear jets....cracked a smile

==============================================================================

"The masses... do not conceive any ideas, sound or unsound. They only choose between the ideologies developed by the intellectual leaders of mankind. But their choice is final and determines the course of events. If they prefer bad doctrines, nothing can prevent disaster."
Re: Occupy Wall Street - Why it's important
October 02, 2011 08:11AM
How could they arrest 700 people when MSNBC reported just the other day that the protests were "down to a couple hundred protesters"?
Anonymous User
Re: Occupy Wall Street - Why it's important
October 02, 2011 08:55AM
HA!

You're right Indy. They must be arrest the 7 people there a hundred times each. Obviously the MSM wouldn't lie about the numbers at the occupation so the protesters must have convinced the police to lie about how many people they arrested.

Damn socialists!
Anonymous User
Re: Occupy Wall Street - Why it's important
October 02, 2011 09:00AM
Actually, I've seen headlines that vary in the number of arrests. I've seen 400, 500 and 700. As for the apparent discrepency with earlier numbers, isn't it possible (and even logical) that the number of protesters would vary from day to day? It makes sense that more people would be there on the weekend.
Re: Occupy Wall Street - Why it's important
October 02, 2011 08:35PM
tons of videos posted to youtube -

very inspiring smiling smiley

and then you have this: [www.innercitypress.com]

jp morgan just gave the nyc cops millions of dollars

of course the cops will protect the pigmen

==============================================================================

"The masses... do not conceive any ideas, sound or unsound. They only choose between the ideologies developed by the intellectual leaders of mankind. But their choice is final and determines the course of events. If they prefer bad doctrines, nothing can prevent disaster."
Re: Occupy Wall Street - Why it's important
October 02, 2011 08:36PM
way to go pttp smiling smiley

i haven't rallied in a while

i need to charge my batteries

houston, are you watching????

==============================================================================

"The masses... do not conceive any ideas, sound or unsound. They only choose between the ideologies developed by the intellectual leaders of mankind. But their choice is final and determines the course of events. If they prefer bad doctrines, nothing can prevent disaster."
Re: Occupy Wall Street - Why it's important
October 03, 2011 12:38AM
Thanks, tx. winking smiley Do you think Houston will have an Occupy event?

United Airline Pilots Occupy Wall Street

[www.youtube.com]

***

"When they say there’s not enough money, they mean there’s not enough money for YOU." - Jill Stein, Green Party presidential nominee.
Re: Occupy Wall Street - Why it's important
October 03, 2011 12:54AM
PowerToThePeople Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Thanks, tx. winking smiley Do you think Houston will have an
> Occupy event?
>
> United Airline Pilots Occupy Wall Street
>
> [www.youtube.com]


we've had some good end the fed rallies

we're late to the party on this one

==============================================================================

"The masses... do not conceive any ideas, sound or unsound. They only choose between the ideologies developed by the intellectual leaders of mankind. But their choice is final and determines the course of events. If they prefer bad doctrines, nothing can prevent disaster."
Re: Occupy Wall Street - Why it's important
October 03, 2011 06:08PM
It is spreading. Several Canadian cities are organising "Occupy" events.

The only problem that I have to this time is that the "occupiers" don't really have a coherent cause. Just a vague protest of corporate greed.

Still, it is a start.

At the Scopes Monkey Trial, Clarence Darrow gave a brilliant speech, but the cynical journalist H.L. Mencken told him "You may as well have shouted it up a waterspout in Outer Mongolia for all the effect it will have on your listeners ..

Ditto here.
Re: Occupy Wall Street - Why it's important
October 03, 2011 07:13PM
I took the Metro up to L.A. last Saturday to attend the occupation at City Hall. Yet I've accepted that we're probably not going to decorporatize, demilitarize, or decorrupt our systems of governance and finance. Mediocre and venal politicians will always rise to power. And criminal elements will still become hedge fund managers and banking execs. We can change our response, how we vote, and we can try to influence people we know, but ultimately everyone makes their own choices. The reds and blues do a sort of psy-ops that's hard to break through. But as more and more Americans feel the effects of the failing economy and the various austerity measures that are being shoved down our throats, more and more will fight back, as we're starting to see, and with the only thing they, we, have left - our bodies.

We're literally paying for their crimes. And they get away with it because they essentially are our government. And more and more Americans are getting that.

Ralph Nader, Ron Paul, Barack Obama - none of those guys are going to change any of that. They can't. No one person could. We're not electing a king. We're electing people, often honest, well-intended people who have to work within a system that has been totally corrupted by corporate money. That's why hardly anything ever gets done for We The People anymore. It can't.

I hold no illusions that the now nationwide Occupy Wall Street rebellion will change any of that, either. But it'll feel much better going down swinging than looking at the third strike.

I'll be posting a piece on Saturday's protest which kicked off the L.A. Occupy event. But I'll say this right now: it was upbeat, well-attended -- at least 1000, maybe 2000 or more at one point - much larger than I expected -- non-violent, and diverse, from libertarians to communists and probably everything in between. There was still a crowd of about 500 when I left, around 8:30. I talked at length with about five people.

***

"When they say there’s not enough money, they mean there’s not enough money for YOU." - Jill Stein, Green Party presidential nominee.



Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 10/03/2011 07:32PM by PowerToThePeople.
Anonymous User
Re: Occupy Wall Street - Why it's important
October 03, 2011 07:20PM
PowerToThePeople Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------

> I'll be posting a piece on Saturday's protest
> which kicked off the L.A. Occupy event. But I'll
> say this right now: it was upbeat, well-attended
> -- at least 1000, maybe 2000 or more at one point
> - much larger than I expected -- non-violent, and
> diverse, from libertarians to communists and
> probably everything in between.

How did you know the peoples' political leanings? Were they carrying signs or did you speak to individuals perhaps? I look forward to seeing your piece. I like your third strike analogy.
Re: Occupy Wall Street - Why it's important
October 03, 2011 07:32PM
Thanks, Curt. winking smiley

Both - from signs and conversations. I was particularly surprised at the high number of Ron Paul supporters. One of the people I talked to turned out to be a facebook friend of a very close friend of mine. Small world.
Re: Occupy Wall Street - Why it's important
October 03, 2011 07:48PM
PowerToThePeople Wrote:
-------------------------------------------------------
> Thanks, Curt. winking smiley
>
> Both - from signs and conversations. I was
> particularly surprised at the high number of Ron
> Paul supporters. One of the people I talked to
> turned out to be a facebook friend of a very close
> friend of mine. Small world.


we've been holding our own rallies for years

glad to get some company smiling smiley

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"The masses... do not conceive any ideas, sound or unsound. They only choose between the ideologies developed by the intellectual leaders of mankind. But their choice is final and determines the course of events. If they prefer bad doctrines, nothing can prevent disaster."
Re: Occupy Wall Street - Why it's important
October 04, 2011 11:58PM
http://www.truthdig.com/images/eartothegrounduploads/HeroesWelcome-500.jpg

[www.truthdig.com]

***

"When they say there’s not enough money, they mean there’s not enough money for YOU." - Jill Stein, Green Party presidential nominee.
Re: Occupy Wall Street - Why it's important
October 05, 2011 12:10AM
possible rally at the fed's castle in houston this weekend - also dallas

stay tuned

==============================================================================

"The masses... do not conceive any ideas, sound or unsound. They only choose between the ideologies developed by the intellectual leaders of mankind. But their choice is final and determines the course of events. If they prefer bad doctrines, nothing can prevent disaster."
Re: Occupy Wall Street - Why it's important
October 06, 2011 02:31PM
some videos - [www.zerohedge.com]

chaos + pepper spray + night sticks flying

good ole luke rudowski right in the middle of the action

==============================================================================

"The masses... do not conceive any ideas, sound or unsound. They only choose between the ideologies developed by the intellectual leaders of mankind. But their choice is final and determines the course of events. If they prefer bad doctrines, nothing can prevent disaster."
Re: Occupy Wall Street - Why it's important
October 07, 2011 08:36PM
cops raid occupation of federal reserve in san fran

[www.sfbg.com]

==============================================================================

"The masses... do not conceive any ideas, sound or unsound. They only choose between the ideologies developed by the intellectual leaders of mankind. But their choice is final and determines the course of events. If they prefer bad doctrines, nothing can prevent disaster."
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